So far my rehoming efforts are going well!

Discussion in 'Pigeons and Doves' started by Sumatra503, Sep 22, 2011.

  1. Sumatra503

    Sumatra503 Kozy Orchard Farms

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    Sep 24, 2010
    I purchased 5 homers 3 weeks ago, 2 blue bars and 3 whites. They are doing quite well and the whites are so stunning. They are July babies and still squeak when they are angry. I just can't take that squeaking serious!

    I released them for the first time 4 days ago and everyone has stuck around. They have never been flown before, so looks like my home will be their home. They were very hesitant at first, but after a bit they flew in some nice circles around the house and then they came back down and landed in the loft again. They are looking to be nice and fast so far. I can't wait to give flying them a try.

    Please note that these are very young birds and most of them still squeak. Otherwise I wouldn't be so willing to let them fly. Adult homers who have been flown rarely call a new place home and will often fly back to their place of birth.
     
  2. KWAK

    KWAK Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 2, 2009
    Michigan
    I just got my first pigeons yesterday, homers! haha!
    I love them. how long before i can fly them and they know my home is home? they are at least a year or 2 old.
     
  3. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    Sep 14, 2008
    Adair Co., KY
    Quote:Since yours are adults, if you try to fly them they will probably return to where they originated. Best to wait until they have babies and work with the babies.

    A friend of mine told me a story about a racing homer cock he'd purchased from a man. My friend owned the bird for a few years and decided to sell it, with the explicit instructions to the new owner not to let the bird fly. The new owner didn't listen and flew the bird 2 weeks after purchasing it. 2 weeks later, that bird wound up back in Idaho at the original owner's house....after being gone for over 5 years.
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2011
  4. KWAK

    KWAK Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 2, 2009
    Michigan
    Quote:Since yours are adults, if you try to fly them they will probably return to where they originated. Best to wait until they have babies and work with the babies.

    A friend of mine told me a story about a racing homer cock he'd purchased from a man. My friend owned the bird for a few years and decided to sell it, with the explicit instructions to the new owner not to let the bird fly. The new owner didn't listen and flew the bird 2 weeks after purchasing it. 2 weeks later, that bird wound up back in Idaho at the original owner's house....after being gone for over 5 years.

    Wow! that isa lng time fo a bird to remember their origanal home! WOW!
    well if they ever do get out its not a big deal because the pigeons belonged to my best friend who only lives a few miles a way :)
     
  5. BorderKelpie

    BorderKelpie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 1, 2009
    outside Dallas
    I am almost ashamed to write this, but yeas ago, I sold an adult Homer hen to a neighbor. I specifically told him never to fly her because I had and she would come home. About a week later, Dallas was happily eating at my place again. The neighbor came back and said he wanted to buy anouther hen (I guess he wasn't about to admit he was wrong), so I sold her to him again. I know, I'm bad, but there were other issues involved and well, I justified it in my own head.
    Guess what - a few days later, there she was again. I again sold her (at a huge discount) to him only to have her return, this time, with some of his rollers.

    He never did come back for them, even though I called him to let him know they were with me.

    I found out that he had been arrested on drug charges and I quit feeling guilty.

    Moral of this story - don't fly your (newly acquired) adults, they are called prisoners for a reason.

    I miss my pigeons. Some day I'd like to have a couple pair again.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2011
  6. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

    23,384
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    Sep 14, 2008
    Adair Co., KY
    Quote:Since yours are adults, if you try to fly them they will probably return to where they originated. Best to wait until they have babies and work with the babies.

    A friend of mine told me a story about a racing homer cock he'd purchased from a man. My friend owned the bird for a few years and decided to sell it, with the explicit instructions to the new owner not to let the bird fly. The new owner didn't listen and flew the bird 2 weeks after purchasing it. 2 weeks later, that bird wound up back in Idaho at the original owner's house....after being gone for over 5 years.

    Wow! that isa lng time fo a bird to remember their origanal home! WOW!
    well if they ever do get out its not a big deal because the pigeons belonged to my best friend who only lives a few miles a way :)

    Not for a racing/homing pigeon. That's what they are bred to do.
     
  7. KWAK

    KWAK Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 2, 2009
    Michigan
    Quote:Wow! that isa lng time fo a bird to remember their origanal home! WOW!
    well if they ever do get out its not a big deal because the pigeons belonged to my best friend who only lives a few miles a way :)

    Not for a racing/homing pigeon. That's what they are bred to do.

    Mine were actually used in races, so does that mean i could eventually let them out? because they are racers?
     
  8. KWAK

    KWAK Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 2, 2009
    Michigan
    Quote:Oh and btw I hope I am as succsesful as you haha! mine will probably vanish! haha. Good luck!
     
  9. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

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    Aug 24, 2008
    Southern Ohio
    Quote:Not for a racing/homing pigeon. That's what they are bred to do.

    Mine were actually used in races, so does that mean i could eventually let them out? because they are racers?

    No they will more than likely home back to their old loft...........

    There is away to break old homers, but alot of work.....they did it during WW ll ......they had moveable lofts..

    Let them have young, clip wings ,but still with good homers and old loft not far away. may not work.

    I try this , clip only part of flight feathers. he still made it back to his old loft (10 miles) took him about a week. lucky his mate raised the young (2 1/2 week old)

    Point i was making can be done , but odd not good. so unless you want to risk losing them ,best to keep them penned up.
     
  10. KWAK

    KWAK Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 2, 2009
    Michigan
    Quote:Mine were actually used in races, so does that mean i could eventually let them out? because they are racers?

    No they will more than likely home back to their old loft...........

    There is away to break old homers, but alot of work.....they did it during WW ll ......they had moveable lofts..

    Let them have young, clip wings ,but still with good homers and old loft not far away. may not work.

    I try this , clip only part of flight feathers. he still made it back to his old loft (10 miles) took him about a week. lucky his mate raised the young (2 1/2 week old)

    Point i was making can be done , but odd not good. so unless you want to risk losing them ,best to keep them penned up.

    Thanks Deerman! I will definatly be keeping them penned up:).
    How have you been feeling?
     

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