So, I watched Food Inc. this morning...

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by jeremy, May 17, 2010.

  1. jeremy

    jeremy CA Royal Blues

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    Oakland, CA
    and all I can bring myself to eat for lunch is eggs, laid by my chickens, that I collected this morning myself.

    What an eye opener. [​IMG] Friends of mine have encouraged me to watch this documentary time and time again. Especially since I'm one who practices (and preaches) self sustainability, organic eating, and am an overall environmentally-conscious person.

    Seeing this film only makes me want to try and do more, to do anything I can to be the only link between my food and myself. I want to be able to grow and raise everything I eat. If that means cutting certain foods out of my diet that I cannot support on the land that I currently have, then so be it. If this sounds a bit irrational to you, then I'm sorry. But how could you not agree, if even a little?

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 17, 2010
  2. DuckLady

    DuckLady Administrator Staff Member

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    This topic has been hashed and rehashed and all have ended up with fighting and flaming and ended up locked.

    However, if the discussion stays civil, you may discuss within the rules.
     
  3. saddina

    saddina Internally Deranged

    May 2, 2009
    Desert, CA
    The thing to keep in mind is that not every farm is like that (in fact we have quite a few family farmers on BYC that are nothing like that). However yes, enough are that way to be hesitant about mass-marketed foods. I think on a whole, taking charge of what you eat, even a step at a time is a move in the right direction.
     
  4. jeremy

    jeremy CA Royal Blues

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    Quote:Word of caution understood completely, please don't hesitate to close the thread if you feel appropriate.
     
  5. sparkles2307

    sparkles2307 Terd of Hurtles

    Ooooo I dont know if I am brave enough!

    We raise our own beef, no shots or chemicals, raise our own feed for them, yeah pretty contained there. My chickens are free range, they get layer ration sometimes, and a bit of oyster shell. But normally they feed themselves and get flax/sunflower scratch to fatten up and get omega fatty acids in the eggs. We use our cow amnure on the garden, aI save seeds if they are easy to save like squash and melons. We raised 100 chickens for meat, and have several of those left in the freezer. We also shoot our quota of deer each year, living in an intensive harvest area that means we get a lot of deer. I avoid McDonalds as much as I can... we try to find local people to get things from like honey, cheese, etc.... speaking of which I need to talk to the Amish down the road about some items!

    I saw something about cleansing commercial burger with amonia to kill e coli. Um yeah and to kill me too I guess! We definitely need tobe more self-sufficient but are off to a good start.
     
  6. jeremy

    jeremy CA Royal Blues

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    Quote:Oh, I realize that not every farm is a giant mass producing conglomerate. The small family run farm featured in the movie is a great example of that.

    We've been practicing everything we can to source where our food comes from, whether that be growing it ourselves, or buying in large part from farmer's markets that are supplied by local growers. There are quite a few co op farmer's that have started growing plots in their own backyards here in the Bay Area that are willing to share and swap with others who like the idea. I feel that's another great way to be selective in what you eat. Not only are you literally picking your own food from the earth, but you're interacting with those who nurtured and grew it, sharing stories and skills to help one another.
     
  7. jeremy

    jeremy CA Royal Blues

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    Quote:I wish I had enough acreage to raise my own cattle for meat and milk. That would be amazing! We've considered goats for milk and rabbits for meat.

    There was a part in the movie that talked about ammonia "cleansed" ground beef to use as filler meat to help prevent E Coli. Yuck. [​IMG]
     
  8. Boyd

    Boyd Recipient of The Biff Twang

    Mar 14, 2009
    MI
    the thing with food inc....... ok... Don't shoot me, but they are trying to sensationalize factory farming. A good majority of farms aren't like what you see there. All you see are a sampling of the worst...............

    ps, on a good note, I am now a HUGE fan of Joel Salatin and polyface farms. I read about him a little bit, read articles on mother earth about him, then saw the movie... then started reading MORE about how he does things.

    Americans no longer produce anything other than food. As quick as big and as much as we can...... So I prefer to make my own ..........
     
  9. jeremy

    jeremy CA Royal Blues

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    Quote:There are always two sides to every story. I figured you had to take this documentary with a grain of salt, just like every other similar to it. Of course they're just going to show the most extravagant examples of what they're trying to portray. I'm also sure that there are other farms that aren't nearly that horrendous.

    But the fact alone that those huge mass producing farms are still in existence as unchecked as they are, that's a little frightening.
     
  10. Boyd

    Boyd Recipient of The Biff Twang

    Mar 14, 2009
    MI
    Quote:There are always two sides to every story. I figured you had to take this documentary with a grain of salt, just like every other similar to it. Of course they're just going to show the most extravagant examples of what they're trying to portray. I'm also sure that there are other farms that aren't nearly that horrendous.

    But the fact alone that those huge mass producing farms are still in existence as unchecked as they are, that's a little frightening.

    it is and it isn't... Americans spend as much on food as they do on where they live. If suddenly we all switched to grass fed, organic, free range food our costs would triple. Not everyone can afford that [​IMG]

    I prefer to move towards "ethical" foods... I try to buy from farms I know, and grow what I can as far as veggies. If somebody lies to me and I buy non organic then shame on me, but I am trying to do the right thing... but there has to be a balance. My household is usually between 8-10 at any given moment. I don't have enough land to raise my own meat veggies fish etc.... so I buy as ethically as I can and make a difference in any way I can.

    But don't ask me to give up my tractor yet... I'm not that green [​IMG]
     

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