So...I would like to know about showing chickens.

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by newgoosegirl, Mar 20, 2011.

  1. newgoosegirl

    newgoosegirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 20, 2009
    I would like to find out some stuff about showing chickens. [​IMG]

    First, how much money does it take? If it's anything like horse showing, then I definitely need to wait a few years. Equipment, entry fees, anything else?

    Next, how do you actually do it? All I've seen of chicken showing is at the state fair, and I've looked at it and I still have no idea. I'm definitely 4H age, but there's no 4H anywhere near me and if there was I don't know if I could do it. So how do you find/get into a show?

    Also, would they throw me out for having a non-SQ bird or would I just place last? I would just maybe like to show for fun, to learn some stuff and show off my pretty chicken, but I would like to know if I would be disqualified or laughed at or anything. [​IMG]

    Lastly, does anybody know of the standard for sebrights? I would like to look at it, but the internet seems to be lacking in that respect.

    Thanks for reading. [​IMG]
     
  2. chickendales

    chickendales Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Michigan
    Quote:showing chickens is not as costly as horses u can show non showquaily bird but they would be dqed or not places if u email me i make copy of sebright standard from my book and email it to i [email protected]
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2011
  3. classicsredone

    classicsredone Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 6, 2011
    Sacramento County, CA
    Are you showing as an adult, or as a youth at fairs? I don't know about adult shows, but the entry fees for fairs are pretty inexpensive. Most of the fees at our fair were $5 from photography to small animals.

    You obviously would save a lot in that you don't need a big trailer, you need considerably less food and space, etc. The most cost would be your initial set up of getting/building a coop and getting quality birds.
     
  4. muddyhorse

    muddyhorse Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 11, 2009
    Bloomsdale, MO
    entry fees range anywhere from $1.50 to $3.50 per bird. you need to have pure bred birds, for showmanship you can use mixed breeds at fairs. you will also need something to transport your birds in like a cat carrier, or you can get a show box.
    you can go to the apa youth website and there are lists of shows by state. you contact the show secretary for a form.
    you need to have your birds tested for pullorium ( it is extremely rare, ) in many states the testing is free. you can contact your states department of agriculture.
    NOBODY will laugh at you at a show ( OK WE GOT SOME LAUGHS THIS WEEKEND WHEN MY SERAMA FLEW OFF THE JUDGING TABLE AND LANDED ON SOMEBODYS HEAD) breeders are ery helpful to youth we know you are the future of the hobby. if your bird has for example the wrong comb it would be disqualified but it won't be asked to leave.
    I don't have a sebright standard.

    I would go to an apa show and talk to breeders
     
  5. newgoosegirl

    newgoosegirl Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 20, 2009
    Definitely not like horse-showing, then! I won't even have the costs getting birds and a coop, because we have chickens already including the boy I would like to show.

    Thanks for the help! I'll see if I can find out more about the youth poultry showing at the fair, I don't think that would be that hard. [​IMG]
     
  6. classicsredone

    classicsredone Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sacramento County, CA
    Quote:Do you have an FFA or 4H group near you? It isn't required for fairs, but it can be helpful to have a group of folks to learn with. I believe you can find the 4h chicken showmanship booklet for free online, too. Since fair season is starting up, it might help to watch the kids show before you get started. I did that when I was showing goats, and it was very helpful. That, and lots of practice.
     

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