So, IF I got a broody hen after some match-making...

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by scullybird, May 5, 2009.

  1. scullybird

    scullybird Out Of The Brooder

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    May 5, 2009
    Corvallis, OR
    ... will she sit on anyone's eggs? We have five hens, and they will share two nest-boxes. Will a broody hen sit on any egg laid in the nest?

    Would we just not collect any eggs until one of them (hopefully) went broody, then isolate her?
     
  2. swtangel321

    swtangel321 ~Crazy Egg Lady~

    Jul 11, 2008
    what kind of birds do you have??

    And yes they will set on ANYONES eggs !!!
     
  3. scullybird

    scullybird Out Of The Brooder

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    May 5, 2009
    Corvallis, OR
    I've got:

    RIR
    white leghorn
    barred rock
    and two black sex-links
     
  4. swtangel321

    swtangel321 ~Crazy Egg Lady~

    Jul 11, 2008
    Hate to be the one who breaks the news to you but..... Those breeds aren't known to go broody often. If you are thinking/want to hatch eggs you should look into getting an incubator (or a silkie)
     
  5. aberfitch

    aberfitch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 24, 2008
    Texas Fort Worth
    I am not sure about the RIR but the thers are for laying eggs so may not be a good idea letting them set.
     
  6. swtangel321

    swtangel321 ~Crazy Egg Lady~

    Jul 11, 2008
    RIR's are a good laying breed also.... Its not that you shouldn't let them set its just that they arent good setters and most likely wont go broody for you !!!
     
  7. mommahento5

    mommahento5 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 6, 2007
    South East Indiana
    The only problem with chickens is they don't read the chicken "rulebook". My supposed to be "non-broody" black rosecomb bantam is setting on 9 eggs right now, and this is her second time being broody (first being last Fall). So just because a breed is "supposed" to be or not be broody, doesn't make it so. It all depends on the chicken. I guess if you want to raise the likelyhood of having a broody hen you would look at other breeds, but all kinds of hens can be broody...just depends on the chicken. Oh and by the way, my female silkie has NEVER been broody. [​IMG]
     
  8. scullybird

    scullybird Out Of The Brooder

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    May 5, 2009
    Corvallis, OR
    I know most of the breeds I chose are layers, not brooders. But, I thought, what the heck. If one takes to brooding, then we'll be prepared. If not, oh, well! It's all a journey, for me. [​IMG]
     
  9. dancingbear

    dancingbear Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 2, 2008
    South Central KY
    Don't waste your eggs leaving them to try to entice a hen into brooding. If you want to leave something as a visual hormone trigger, (yes, sometimes that really does help, but don't count on it) get some wooden or ceramic eggs, or some golf balls. My dad used to use ping pong balls, but I'd think a little weight in them makes them more believable to a hen. Or put melted paraffin (for weight) in empty plastic Easter eggs and glue them shut.

    Anyway, there are a lot a really broody breeds, not just silkies. I don't like silkies myself, and have never had any of them, but I have FIVE broody hens right now. Two dark Cornish (great moms!) and 3 mixed breeds. The mixes are combos of light Brahma,(more really terrific moms) buff Brahma, dark Cornish, and Australorp. Cochins are good moms, as are many kinds of bantams.

    RIR's rarely brood, but when they do, they're usually good moms. Your Barred Rock might brood. Many say Orpingtons brood a lot, but mine haven't, except one or two, long, long, ago. Australorps can be broody, too, but you can't beat a dark Cornish as a mom. Much better at staying on the correct nest than the Brahmas! The Brahmas are dedicated, but easily confused.
     

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