Some broody hatching questions

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by BarkerChickens, Nov 8, 2009.

  1. BarkerChickens

    BarkerChickens Microbrewing Chickenologist

    Nov 25, 2007
    High Desert, CA
    I stuck several eggs under my broody. This both hers and my first time. Few questions...

    1) I have a flashlight that uses the 18 V batteries that are shared with the power tools. Is this flashlight powerful enough for candling? It's the biggest flashlight I have (my other one is a small mag light). I would rather get another one now if it won't work.

    2) She is in the community nest that is ~3 or 3.5 feet off the floor. Will this be ok for the chicks (move them after they hatch), or do I need to to find a way to move her before the chicks hatch?

    3) Our coop is raised off the ground and their is a ramp that the chickens use. Is this ok for the little chicks? Will she just keep them in the coop until they are big enough to use the ramp?

    4) I am hoping to keep her in the coop with the whole flock. Do I switch the whole the flock over the starter or can I use the laying pellets still (raised feeder) and have the starter at a lower level for the chicks?
     
  2. mulia24

    mulia24 Chillin' With My Peeps

    1) the ability to *see thru* the egg isn't depend only from the size of flashlight but the brightness of the flashlight. a US$2 5 LEDs powered flashlight here easily *penetrate* my chicken egg. [​IMG]

    2) well, i don't know feet, we use meter here. half meter or about 50 cm still can be *handle* by the chicks. since you're using community nest, it would be danger if other hen lay egg on the nest and naturally the broody will try to *grab* every egg she find and if the egg that your hen sit now is reaching 5 days and she still stealing other hens egg so the age of sitting other egg will be short, so when she move out with the hatched chicks, surely you'll have so many dead chicks that haven't hatch yet (i hope you understand what i mean) . i'd like to suggest you to move broody hen to an isolated but still large to give her spreading her wing and walk around so both the egg (then chicks) and the hen will be safe. when you decided to move her, make sure you do it at dark night with gently pull her out and move her to the desired (by you) nest box. better to check her loyalty of broodiness after moving her.

    3) no, she won't know when the chicks big enough to use ramp [​IMG] . it's better to isolate her or put her and the nest at lower ground, i'm afraid the chicks will follow their mom and well, we know the chicken like to jump than to use the ramp as stairs like we human, and surely the chicks will have their legs broken or worse death.

    4) i've read many of these, usually momma hen and other flock will even eat the starter, they won't care it labeled starter or laying pellet. you can use starter and mix it with laying or isolate the mom and chicks so only mom and the chicks will eat the starter,as the mom isn't laying when raising babies there will be no need to have laying pellet.

    perhaps my suggestion possess many mistakes, do pardon me as human did many mistakes and no human being without mistake. and hopefully the expert will help you too. [​IMG]
     
  3. pixie74943

    pixie74943 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 25, 2009
    Adelaide, Australia
    [​IMG]
    Quote:[​IMG] Good Luck!!
     
  4. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    Feb 5, 2009
    South Georgia
    I move my broodies to a ground level nest (cardboard box, kitty litter pan, whatever) while they were still setting. I let her raise the chicks in with the flock. Both mamas protected the chicks from other hens; the roos did not bother the chicks and the mamas ignored them. I had starter and layer available for the older ones, but the layer was in hanging feeders which were too high for the chicks to reach. I always keep oyster shell and grit available for everyone, separately. The chicks don't pay any attention to the oyster shell, and I figure the extra protein in the starter is good for the hens, too. Worked fine for me. I have 4 or 5 more eggs due to hatch in a few days, under a different broody. I want to have mamas that can raise chicks this way. The chicks were outdoors at a few days old, stayed out from under their mamas all day in temps in the 70's.
     
  5. BarkerChickens

    BarkerChickens Microbrewing Chickenologist

    Nov 25, 2007
    High Desert, CA
    Regarding the broody stealing eggs. Labeling!! [​IMG] I pull the stolen eggs every day. I don't mind moving her to a new nest, but I will have to move her to the house if the chicks can't handle the ramp (or build a wire brooder within the coop). I can't put her outside (too cold at night). So, at what age would the chicks be ok with the ramp? It is about 2 feet high. If I make a wire brooder cage, I can keep her and the chicks in their for a short time before letting them all out to free range with everyone.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2009
  6. RevaVirginia

    RevaVirginia Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 26, 2009
    Reva, VA
    Sure doesn't take them long to be able to negotiate a ramp. Within two weeks I'm certain.
     
  7. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    Quote:The one thing I remember from my broody is seperating them from the flock. Man oh man can a broody mama be MEAN! and the other hens will pick at the chicks.
     
  8. BarkerChickens

    BarkerChickens Microbrewing Chickenologist

    Nov 25, 2007
    High Desert, CA
    Quote:Isn't that the point of her being mean? To prevent the other hens from being mean? I think I have talked David (DH) into building a quick brooder inside the coop.
     
  9. debilorrah

    debilorrah The Great Guru of Yap Premium Member

    Quote:Isn't that the point of her being mean? To prevent the other hens from being mean? I think I have talked David (DH) into building a quick brooder inside the coop.

    Yes that is the point, but she will come after you too once the picking starts. THAT is why we moved them.
     

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