Some Button Quail questions

Discussion in 'Quail' started by Saphine, Nov 18, 2013.

  1. Saphine

    Saphine Out Of The Brooder

    17
    0
    22
    Nov 18, 2013
    Piedmont of NC
    Hi! Yesterday at a bird expo I adopted two button quails! I can't find any good charts on breeds/mutations and I would like to know what they are. :)

    Button #1 (no name yet!):
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Notice that she? he? has a bare back. The breeders told me it's because they pluck feathers to nest, or are too slow. Am I risking anything from getting a plucked one? It's very cute and not too afraid of the camera. Also, I've read that the white patch on the wing signals it carries the white gene.

    Button #2:
    [​IMG]
    This one seems to be fully feathered (I've noticed they can hide it pretty well) and since it's white I can't tell if it's male or female. What mutation might it be?

    They are housed together in a guinea pig cage. I know I need to boink-proof the roof, but what material should I use? For now I'm just really cautious around them.

    If they are both males, should I separate them? I hadn't planned on two cages. What if they're both females, will they have any problems? And if nobody can tell their gender, then any tips?

    Sorry for the ton of questions, but there's not too much info on buttons that I can find, and most of the info I've found is from here.


    Thanks in advance! :)
     
  2. GrandmaBird

    GrandmaBird Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,277
    32
    151
    May 28, 2012
    Colorado
     
  3. Saphine

    Saphine Out Of The Brooder

    17
    0
    22
    Nov 18, 2013
    Piedmont of NC
    Oh, THANK YOU!! I'm so happy that she's a hen- I was very worried that they would be males! And I will try to check the white one, although that's the skittish one. And we got 1,000 mealworms from the breeder, so I'll watch for any behavior! ;) I also bought some high-cal grit that they have been gobbling up. Should I always provide grit or only once in a while?

    And thank you for the diet tips- at the moment they are getting seed (temporarily! Until we can make a trip to the feed store) and some apples, which they've nibbled at. These are actually my first 'poultry' birds, as I have more experience with parrots. They do like to scatter their bedding around- had to change the water because a bunch pine shavings in there!

    I'm crossing my fingers for the white one to be male! There was a pretty silver male (pretty sure he was a male) there but he got adopted before I could get him. :( I did get some pictures of him before he left, he was a handsome fellow! (He went to a nice home too, the lady who adopted him has a large aviary were she keeps them with some finches).

    [​IMG]

    One more question, this time on the possibility of chicks: I am in high school and I don't have an incubator; however, my Animal Science teacher does and we hatched Rhode Island Reds earlier this year. He offered to hatch any eggs I might happen to get, but then what? Would incubator-raised chicks be accepted by the female? Would the chicks need a brooder? I don't exactly plan on breeding on purpose, but if I do get chicks I want to be ready.

    Thank you so much for the help, I want to raise these little guys the best I can! [​IMG]
     
  4. Saphine

    Saphine Out Of The Brooder

    17
    0
    22
    Nov 18, 2013
    Piedmont of NC
    Update- I checked the white one, but no reddish feathers, only white underneath (he was a bit ruffled when I put him back in the cage, lol, and the female went over to cuddle him). I will try with mealworms later!
     
  5. GrandmaBird

    GrandmaBird Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,277
    32
    151
    May 28, 2012
    Colorado
    It would be in your best interest to buy this book from Jodi McDonald at www.brackenridgeranch.com
    she is the leading lady when it comes to buttons, well in my opinion and a lot of other people too!
    You could take the eggs in to be incubated at school but yes you would need to have a brooder set-up (the hen will not accept them) and ready as early as day 13. Which would be the day the eggs are stopped turning, they must be turned several times a day from day one to 13 then not turned again, it can take 16-21 days to hatch but most happen on day 15-17 if the temp and humidity are correct. This is why I suggest the book. it not as easy as you think but its not that hard once you have all the information and equipment. I can give you more information but if you really want what is best for your birds then I would buy the book, it covers everything from nutrition to health.
    To keep the water cleaner use a side attaching bird or animal feeder/waterer. the tube type things or the bottle that attaches to the outside of the cage. If you have had parakeets or other birds the same type of water tube. The quail will find it rather fast and then you can remove the one that they are getting dirty. Do leave the grit/oyster shell down all the time they need the calcium eating a caged diet.
    Good luck!
     
  6. Saphine

    Saphine Out Of The Brooder

    17
    0
    22
    Nov 18, 2013
    Piedmont of NC
    Thank you again! I emailed the lady at zebrafinch.com and she ID'd my white button as a female (red breasted tuxedo). So no chicks for me, I guess! And I'm looking into quite a few button books, thank you for the suggestion.
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by