Some eggs hatching early. Confused.

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by bre113, Sep 5, 2014.

  1. bre113

    bre113 Out Of The Brooder

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    This is my first hatch since I was a kid. Today's day 20, and I had two hatch during the night. I have several more pipped (can't tell how many because I have old styrofoam incubator with the really small viewing plastic.) but I have 35 eggs, 19 I KNOW were alive on day 17 from candling. What do I do when the first 24 hours since hatching is up if I still have unhatched eggs (ei. Do I remove hatched chicks, leave remaining eggs alone? As I know chicks can survive 24 hours on membrane. ) I'm just confuse about what to do after this time passes if some of the eggs that I know should hatch haven't yet, but I have chicks that need to come out.
    Also, I had 5 chicks that appeared to have died between candling on day 14, and candling on day 17, and well as 4 that died pretty early, leaving a partial-full blood ring. Have I done something wrong? Thanks!
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    Don’t get hung up on the 21 day thing. There are a lot of reasons eggs might hatch early or late; heredity, humidity, how and how long eggs were stored before incubation started, or just basic differences in individual eggs. A huge factor is incubation temperature. If you incubator is a tad cool the eggs can be late. If it is just a little warm they can be early. Generally if the eggs hatch within 24 hours either side of the due date I consider them right on time. With them being a bit early your incubator may be running just a tiny bit warm, but then it might not. I see nothing major wrong with the timing but if your next two hatches are also early you might want to try to tweak the temperature down a tiny bit.

    The chicks absorb the yolk before they hatch. They can live off of that for 3 days or more. I don’t know where you got that 24 hours on membrane. Its more than 72 hours on the absorbed yolk. That’s why they can be shipped in the mail, over 72 hours, usually a fair amount more. The chicks don’t need to come out after 24 hours. They need to come out after 3 days.

    After your hatch is over I suggest you open the unhatched eggs and try to determine why they did not hatch. That’s not always easy. There are many different things that can cause an egg to not develop or die at any stage. In general if the egg stopped developing within the first week of incubation the cause was something that happened before incubation started. If it dies in the last week it probably had something to do with your actual incubation, but that is in general, not always true. This article may help you determine what happened.

    http://urbanext.illinois.edu/eggs/res24-00.html

    Congratulations on the hatch so far and good luck the rest of the way.
     
  3. chickengeorgeto

    chickengeorgeto Overrun With Chickens

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    Leave your hatched biddies alone for at least 24 and preferably for 72 hours after hatching. Newly hatched chicks still have a gob of egg yoke attached to their abdomens and this needs to be absorbed (as food) before the chicks start dragging their yoke sacks or navels through all the germs that are present in chicken poop and brooders. It would be interesting and maybe educational to see where any dead chicks' heads are in relation to their bodies. If the head isn't tucked under the right wing that chick is not in the correct position to begin hatching.

    If you have un-hatched eggs after day 22 toss them. The live chicks in the incubator will cheep their little heads off and this noise acts on un hatched biddies to stimulate the hatching instinct. You can observe this instinct when hen hatching because while the old hen is still on her nest she will call or cluck to her brood even in the night and the chicks will answer. I believe that the pecking order is at work even at this young age because I think that instinctively none of the chicks want to be the youngest or last hatched and run the risk of ending up at the bottom of the pecking order.
     
  4. bre113

    bre113 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you! I knew my incubator was closer to 100, but I tried turning it down muptiple times, but it never would come down! We hope to invest in a new incubator soon, as we constantly want eggs in the bator to raise for meat. We just wanted to see how this round went first before making a final decision.
    We collected eggs for 6 days before incubation. I put the eggs in the turner inside the incubator base, but without the top, and turned the turner on until I got all the eggs collected, then I put the top on and turned it on.
    My daughter (3) helped me collect eggs, so tough handling may have been the culprit to those which never developed at all (6) and those that died early (4) but it's hard to tell her no when our chickens just started laying for the first time, and she's thrilled to collect eggs! Lol if that's what it comes to, I'll take the loss of a few chicks.
    Also, I wasn't expecting the best turn out, because our hens had just started laying a week- two weeks before, and some eggs were still a little awkward shaped, and one was cracked and I didn't know it.
    This is much better than my last batch already though! Last time I put the eggs in upside down, and all the chicks died, almost all fully developed. :(
     
  5. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    Pullet eggs like that are harder to hatch and raise that eggs from hens that have been laying longer. There are a lot of things that the hen has to get right for the egg to hatch and sometimes it takes a while for the pullet to get the kinks worked out of her internal egg making factory. What is amazing to me is how many get it right to start with.

    I’ve hatched pullet eggs before and will continue to do so when I want to. But I normally don’t get as good a hatch rate with pullet eggs as with larger eggs. Sometimes I get great hatch rates but often I don’t.

    I seldom lose a chick after it hatches, whether hatched under a broody and raised by a broody or hatched in an incubator and raised in my brooder. When I lose one it is often the chicks from those tiny pullet eggs. Since the eggs are small they don’t contain as many nutrients as the bigger eggs so the chick is limited in how big and strong it can grow. They are smaller and I believe weaker than the other chicks. While those baby chicks are normally really tough that little bit of difference in them seems to make the pullet egg chicks more difficult to raise. Still, if you can get through the first couple of weeks with them they should do great.

    I’ve read that smaller eggs tend to hatch earlier than larger eggs but I really haven’t noticed that to be consistent. Maybe a little bit sometimes but not really by much.
     
  6. bre113

    bre113 Out Of The Brooder

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    Interesting! Kind of what I figured, but we have 4 chicks now, 2 I can definitely see are pipped, and on I can see looks cracked half way around, so we know there should be atleast 7 to hatch. I think we're doing pretty good so far with eggs from inexperienced hens being hatched by an inexperienced hatcher in a cheap incubator! Lol you have to start somewhere though!!
     
  7. bre113

    bre113 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 2, 2014
    We currently have 6 hatched right not, and 2 hatching! :)
     

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