Some questions on Farmland and Rivers...

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by Chicken7777, Oct 14, 2011.

  1. Chicken7777

    Chicken7777 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hello and good evening,

    Thank you for seeing my thread![​IMG] I have some family members who are purchasing farmland in NY State, and I have been helping them with the purchase in finding the right property for a small farming operation they want to do. The thing is that after seeing a couple of properties with some acreage we finally found one that meets their price budget and fits their expectations. The property is flat, some parts pasture other parts wooded. Behind the property there is a river/creek. The thing is that I have never thought about it but is having a river behind, near or in a farm property a benefit or a liability?

    I have always thought of having a water source nearby like a river as a benefit to purchasing a property, but with some recent floodings I am not sure of what to think.
    With the recent floods that have occured in the north east with the past hurricane and other rains, the rain has overflowed the rivers and it has flooded many farmland and the crops in them. Of course this is not something that happens everytime, it could be as something abnormal but I would like to know what your opinions are.

    Are rivers good to have in a farm property? What could be some ways to reduce flooding of a river near a farmland property? Should farmland with rivers be avoided when looking for land to buy?

    I greatly appreciate your suggestions and thoughts.

    Thank you very much. [​IMG]
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    It depends very much upon the river and the area. The area around Corning/Elmira/Binghamton is subject to severe flooding. Do your research prior to buying.
     
  3. Capvin

    Capvin Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I own farmland and wooded area in Upstate NY and I have a creek that runs through the property and wish it was larger. I guess it would depend upon where you are talking about in order to determine if it has a possibility of flooding. I have never had any flooding (or anything even near flooding). In any case, having a water source is a hugh benefit.
     
  4. Chicken7777

    Chicken7777 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes I would think of having a water source as a great benefit mainly when you are going to grow many crops and raise animals.
    The property is located in Orange County NY near the wallkill river if any of you have heard of this location.

    Thank you again guys and please continue to give your suggestions and thoughts, they are greatly appreciated!
     
  5. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Recently during Hurricane Irene and a subsequent storm our local news had several stories of extensive flooding of the Walkill. [​IMG] Do a search and see what you come up with, but I would recommend caution.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2011
  6. eggbuster

    eggbuster Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It isn't just a matter of flooding ect... you need to know if there are any water authorities connected to that river. Many places have restrictions on the types of farming activities that can be carried out within a 1/4 mile of any water way; not just rivers.

    If there is a town down river, they may get their drinking water from the river and you won't be allowed to graze animals, spread fertilizer, use chemicals, ect... without some major restrictions such as having to fence the water way 300-900 ft on either side. A water way can be any little ditch draining into that river from your property. Can you afford to lose the use of this land if this is the case? You will not be compensated. You may have to have some elaborate manure storage facities even if you only have 1 cow and some chickens. Everyone big or small gets lumped under the same laws. When you buy farmland you are buying into all the government regulations concerning farming. Are you sure it will even be legal to do the things you want? Small farmers are much more restricted then you might think. Learn all of the regulations that will affect your plans unless you don't mind having nothing more then a lot of yard upkeep.

    Check out the propertie's deeds for restrictions and check with local water authorites before signing on the dotted line. Do not take a real estate agent's word for any of this. They are not resposible for getting it right or wrong. You are.

    Don't want to be a party pooper, but I learned too many things too late.
     

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