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Somebody pecked a hole in my bird's leg!

Discussion in 'Meat Birds ETC' started by Tracydr, Dec 10, 2011.

  1. Tracydr

    Tracydr Chillin' With My Peeps

    So, found one of my Cornish boy's with a hole about the diameter of a 50 cent piece and about as deep as half my thumb in his thigh today. He's obviously not feeling well, although eating, drinking, grazing, he has a bit of a droopy tail and that leg is warm with a pale area of meat around the injury. No smell, bleeding or any discharge. He was fine yesterday, at least I'm pretty sure he was.
    He's ready to process but I'm concerned that he could have a nasty systemic infection. I separated him and put him in the garden with a few silky chicks where he can run around and eat fresh rye grass. I also gave him a shot of pen-procaine. Meat withdrawal time for pork with the pen, according to the label is 7 days.
    Any thoughts? I considered processing and just discarding that quarter but I don't like that his tail was droopy. I'd hate to make family or pets sick if he has staph or clostridium.
     
  2. mstricer

    mstricer Overrun With Chickens

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    Sounds like a rat. Rats will do that when chickens are sleeping. Just come up and bite a piece of them.
     
  3. Tracydr

    Tracydr Chillin' With My Peeps

    Hmm. I hope not.I hate rats, they give me the creeps for some odd reason. We have a lot of feral cats that should keep them in check, although I know some people in AZ have rats that eat citrus, I've never noticed any crop loss. I kind of figured somebody started pecking and wouldn't stop. I have the Cornish in with my layers and some extra packing peanuts. There's quite a bit of room, about 100 feetx 20 feet for 40 chickens but the hens get cranky with the fat boys at times, especially my Fayoumis.
    Anyway, my biggest concern is treatment and if we should eat, not eat, cull, feed to dogs, or what to do with the poor guy,these Cornish must be impervious to pain, he's not limping at all!
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2011
  4. TDM

    TDM Chillin' With My Peeps

    Chickens cannibalize each other, and a lethargic Cornish Cross is a prime target to be pecked at. Once the blood flows, it gets even worse. They will even pull the intestines out of the bird.

    I process a lot of people's birds, and I often see this sort of wound. I personally have had pullet hens poking holes in my Cornish Cross. All I did was sprinkle blood stop powder on the wound, and most of the time it scabbed over and healed on its own in several weeks. Of course, the chicken may have to be parted out for aesthetic purposes.
     
  5. Tracydr

    Tracydr Chillin' With My Peeps

    That's what I figured. I'm hoping one shot of penicillin will put a stop to any minor infection, I can give him a week and process him next week, knowing I'll have to cut around that area or even throw out that quarter. I've separated him from the others.
     
  6. Tracydr

    Tracydr Chillin' With My Peeps

    Well, he's happily running around and eating everything in sight today, no more droopy tail. Penicillin must have done the trick. Looks good other than the gaping hole in his thigh! Cornish X are pretty oblivious to anything but food, aren't they?
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2011
  7. TDM

    TDM Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:For me, the problem of having my Cornish Cross pecked at by pullet hens grew as time when on. Like you, it wasn't an overcrowding issue because I run about 300 birds per acre.
     
  8. Tracydr

    Tracydr Chillin' With My Peeps

    Yeah, well they will all be getting processed this week except Gimpy. I've had a rotten cold/ bronchitis or I would have done them earlier.
    All has gone well and I agree, I doubt there is a crowding issue. Plenty do square footage in the pen and when they were little the Pullets were pretty good with them. I think they just plop in front of the feeders of which there are several, and irritate the layers. I have small, relatively "wild type Pullets" such as fayoumis and Hamburgs which seem less tolerant of laziness.
     

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