Someone please clarify these myths!!!

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by newchickiefarmer, Jul 22, 2008.

  1. newchickiefarmer

    newchickiefarmer Out Of The Brooder

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    Okay expert chickeners... this rookie needs some help! Here are some things I've read about and heard since beginning my chicken journey, I keep hearing or reading both sides and I don't know which is right!! here we go and thanks for all your posts!!

    A: You shouldn't handle baby chicks (by baby I mean 2-3 weeks) because you may transfer something to the chicks that will make them sick.

    flipside: You should handle baby chicks as much as possible to get them used to people.

    B: A coop that only has hens as residents will not provide any eggs, a rooster is needed for eggs.

    flipside: a rooster is only needed when you want baby chicks.

    C: A heat lamp in the coop during winter (Montana) weather will keep the chickens warm and alive.

    flipside: you don't need a heat lamp during the winter, just make sure they are protected from any wind or moisture.

    I hope this made sense and I hope some veteran chickeners can help. I appreciate it!!
     
  2. Year of the Rooster

    Year of the Rooster Sebright Savvy

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    West Central Ohio
    Well I know one thing..... YOU DO NOT NEED A ROOSTER FOR EGGS! People always seem to think that, so you only need a rooster if you want little fuzzy butts(chicks) running around [​IMG] . You can also handle chicks at any age. The more you hold them, the more they will want to come near you, like you more, etc.

    Hope this helps [​IMG]
     
  3. SterlingAcres

    SterlingAcres Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 17, 2008
    Poconos, PA
    A: Handle them as much as you want. I've never 'given' a chick any diseases whatsoever.

    B. You don't need roos for eggs. Do you need a man to ovulate? Same thing.

    C. If you're somewhere cold, it's better to insulate and have a heat source for extreme weather. I believe chickens will be fine to about 0 degrees. I've read colder.

    Good luck. [​IMG]
     
  4. newchickiefarmer

    newchickiefarmer Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 16, 2008
    Montana
    ahhh you guys are the greatest! and i think the home page is right..this place is addicting!!!!
     
  5. HeadHen

    HeadHen Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 1, 2008
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    On B:
    I can tell you that the hens will lay without a rooster. Just like a woman ovulates every month a hen ovulates about every 25 hours. The eggs are unfertilized and will never make a baby chick. If you want a chick to hatch you will need a rooster to make them fertile before they are laid.
     
  6. greenthumb89

    greenthumb89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    ive handled my chicks since day old so that they get used to me and because i really like i twhen they follow me around.

    rooster needed for eggs? mo just think about commercial egg production...all hens rooster only needed for fertile eggs.

    and as long as you have a wind block is all i am using (in wisconsin) becasue as long as the birds can huddle together they should be fine. i also insulated my coop with that pink styrofoam stuff was told i didnt really need to but i did anyway. hope this helps but you will probably need a night during winter if you want to keep egg production up
     
  7. blue fire

    blue fire Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A. handle Chicks as much as you can, If you had other poulty with possable diseases, I would be carefull, but still handle them
    B.You don't need roos for your hen to lay, but if you want chicks, extra hen protection, and a reduced possablity of she-males, you will want a rooster
    C.There is a lot of controversy with that, If you use the heat lamp, the chickens don't get used to the cold and will depend on the heat lamp. If you don't use a heat lamp they will adapt to the weather, but there is the posability of some dieing. I like the adaptation meathod myself, because if that heat lamp stops working and you don't know it your in trouble.
     
  8. newchickiefarmer

    newchickiefarmer Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 16, 2008
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    B.You don't need roos for your hen to lay, but if you want chicks, extra hen protection, and a reduced possablity of she-males, you will want a rooster

    C.If you use the heat lamp, the chickens don't get used to the cold and will depend on the heat lamp. If you don't use a heat lamp they will adapt to the weather, but there is the posability of some dieing.

    I've heard that too about the adaptation. I guess some common sense comes in to play there. But we still have a while before the dread comes in (either that or in 5 minutes it will snow..gotta love Montana!!)


    also...what on earth is a she-male? I know what it is...but with chickens?​
     
  9. Arctichicken

    Arctichicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Tasmania, Australia
    First off [​IMG] you will find lots of help here from lots of people. Also check out the "Learning center" and "breeds" section at the very top of the page. Lots of good info there!


    I'm no expert but here's my help.

    A. I handle my baby chicks and they seem to enjoy when I visit with them. They come up to me when I stick my hand in their brooder and look for any treats. They are sooo cute and sweet.

    B. Like everyone else said you do not need a rooster unless you want to hatch some baby chicks later. If you just want eggs for eating get laying hens.

    C. As far as the cold weather...I live in Alaska. We are converting an old shed that was already insulated and are going to have a regular light on a timer so they have 12-14 hours of daylight or else they won't lay. I will also have a heat lamp on at night.

    Hope this helps!!! [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2008
  10. blue fire

    blue fire Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Murfreesboro, TN
    A she-male is a hen that turns into a male, it is rare, but can happen, hens naturaly have a need for a rooster but they can do without them most of the time. She males can be hens that crow or change there apperence and still lay eggs and some have even tried to mate with other hens.
     

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