Sometimes you get to even the score

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Tenneesse, Oct 15, 2014.

  1. Tenneesse

    Tenneesse Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 24, 2010
    Woodbury, Middle Tn
    I was reclining and enjoying a good book on making Pasta when out of the corner of my eye I saw what we all fear when we range our birds. The storm door window was up just a slight drizzle on a warm day but it was too late he had already grabbed the hen I keep my shotgun in arms reach but was unable to drop this Bobcat as he tried to run with his kill. I put him down when he returned to get my girl.

    I can replace the screen but I never be able to replace Willimetta.

    The Bob goes to the taxidermist and Willi is in the garden now. She will help with next springs roses. [​IMG]
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    Makes me so angry. Thanks for all the smiles you brought to my face little one. I'll miss you.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2014
  2. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

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    So sorry you lost her but, glad the bobcat didn't get to enjoy his catch. You really have great reflexes to stop him before he disappeared with her.
     
  3. Fly Right

    Fly Right Out Of The Brooder

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    So sorry for your loss. Glad you got the culprit. May I suggest putting that second picture on the "what's this chicken thinking" thread? Then she will live here on BYC forever. It's a very popular thread and it might bring you a few laughs.
     
  4. Tenneesse

    Tenneesse Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 24, 2010
    Woodbury, Middle Tn
    Thanks, it all feels so unreal now. I was too late to do anything for her. I had missed my first chance when I failed to take the safty off. I went out to asses the damage and had a feeling maybe it wasn't over. I looked back at the screen door to see if I would be visible and it appeared as though there would be no seeing in. I left her lay where she was and went inside, turned off the light I was reading by and waited. In about 30 minutes he came back for his kill, I had made sure the glass was up and my field of view was about 2 feet either side of her and when he came into view he was about 3 steps from her as he paused to grab her I was able to take him. He is laying right where he took his last step. I love all critters but..... My wife arrived home from work about 15 minutes after I shot the Bob and asked why it smelled like gun powder in the living room and hadn't seen the screen door until I told her what had happened.

    No my reflexes are not that good , maybe if I had not fumble the safety I'd got him initially . Not a sweet victory by a long shot (no pun intended).
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  5. Tenneesse

    Tenneesse Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 24, 2010
    Woodbury, Middle Tn
    I'll do just that. Great suggestion. Thanks for your thoughts.
     
  6. tcstoehr

    tcstoehr Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 25, 2014
    Canby, Oregon
    Well... I'm impressed. Most of us don't even get a look at the culprit. You spotted him and took him down while reading a book, inside your house no less.
     
  7. Tenneesse

    Tenneesse Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 24, 2010
    Woodbury, Middle Tn
    Im really didnt know what was taking them about every 10 days I would loose one of my 5 remaining Coochins and a friend gave me Willimeta a Wyanndotte 7 days prior to this attack. Always a pile of rump feathers but no sign of a bird or even a trail of feathers telling me which direction so I was really set on hawk attacks. The attack prior to this one was on the 6th My most beautiful Choochin rooster was lying dead and Jazzmin the last Choocin pullet was gone no sign of anything have taken her, I thought she went into deep hiding but she never came out and it makes me think Im dealing with a pair of Bob. Very likely.

    I have to decide. No more chickens or keep them cooped I cant see that happening. We have had chickens now about 5 years those are all now gone all to stray dogs 3 of which no longer stray and there was a lull until this started. No more dogs I think my neighbor realized I have a low tolerance for his mongrels strays he picks up and brings home, ive told him keep them home or lose them. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2014
  8. Wasson6Pack

    Wasson6Pack Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 30, 2012
    Lewisburg, TN
    I see we have similar problem, but yours has had a better outcome than mine. I live south of Nashville and have realized in the last 3-4 weeks we have what we think is a Bob Cat or what my munchkins call the "Sneak Thief". The reason we say we think is that it seems to not have spots and I know that they don't all, but we haven't gotten close enough to be completely sure, but we are pretty sure.

    As for that, I am at my whits end. The final straw was that last night it took my only turkey left and sat and ate him behind the barn. The problem I have is that he comes from the woods towards the barn and in doing so is blocked by the barn from seeing him from the house. Do you have thoughts on ways to trap it or what I can do? I am guessing I will have to sit outside overnight a couple times and put out a chicken in a cage to lure it in. I need a Bob Cat rug!

    Thanks,
    Angi
     
  9. Free Feather

    Free Feather Chillin' With My Peeps

    He did you no personal wrong...He was just doing what all nature does, even us. Kill to survive. People do not want to hear it, but it is the one hundred percent truth. It is okay for us, but not okay for them?
     
  10. thomasboyle

    thomasboyle Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I think most on BYC will agree that we do not enjoy killing predators. They are beautiful and often majestic animals. But as responsible owners of livestock, we can't allow the animals that we are raising to become prey. We know we can't stop all predator attacks on our livestock, but when a predator attacks and then keeps coming back for more, we either have to stand by and let our livestock be killed, or we have to take steps to stop the predator. Neither one is a good choice, as both choices involve the death of animals, but most owners will choose to defend their livestock and kill the predator instead of simply letting their livestock be killed.
     
    5 people like this.

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