Someting is hunting our chickens!

Discussion in 'Predators and Pests' started by Cynthia 085, Sep 6, 2014.

  1. Cynthia 085

    Cynthia 085 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi guys :)

    Well I am a bit paranoid. Our neighbors chicken got eaten by something.

    They are devastated to have lost their hen that way; she was an Easter egger; their chickens are very paranoid and hide in the bushes all the time or get on the roof of their house.

    My neightboor told me out of precaution; he said to watch my girls.

    He said it came in the morning (7am) and that he suspects a cat. However, are cats not nocturnal? What would snatch up the chicken that early in the morning?

    He said he found a trail of feathers over his fence where the predator had "carried" his chicken over the fence.

    What could this be? We live in the city. I don't want my girls eaten...they do free roam as they are backyard chickens.

    Another question I have is why did the predator attack theirs and not ours?

    I know my chickens can be mean, but surely that has nothing to do with it. (Buff Rock, Ancona, RRP). They are full size though while theirs were a few months younger than ours.

    This really sucks. I would be very very angry if one of my girls died because of a roaming cat.

    Please let me know what you guys think :) I am new to chickens and would hate to keep them in the coop when we have so much space for them in the backyard; sure they would be safe in the coop run, but we have all of our backyard for them. I don't own dogs or cats it is just my girls out there. It is just not fair. I feel so bad for their loss :(

    Thanks
    Cynthia
     
  2. iwiw60

    iwiw60 Overrun With Chickens

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    Almost sounds to me like a fox or coyote. Raccoons tend to wreak havoc, take the heads off, and leave...they kill for the thrill of it. Fox and coyotes, however, will snatch up hens and take them with them to another area to finish off.

    Did your neighbor see any tracks? Were they free-ranging when they got attacked? It's good that you have a run for your girls because free-ranging would be out right now. With that said, how "predator-proof" is your run? Do you have any pics that we can view?

    I personally am not an advocate of free-ranging and am a firm believer in S-S-S .. Shoot, Shovel, Shut Up. Between your neighbor and yourself I hope you get the scumbags!
     
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  3. Howlet

    Howlet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    if your TRULY in the city, a cat is 100% practical. cats WILL go after chickens, but however they often dont make off with it alive. so either a big cat or a Coyote.... when i think city i dont think foxes xP
     
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  4. Folly's place

    Folly's place Chicken Obsessed

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    Foxes live in cities too, and coyotes are also possible. And owls. And the list goes on... Chickens need to be in predator proof housing at least dusk to later in the morning, and a safe run is also vital, for the times when they can't range during the day. Like now, when you have an active predator situation. Set live traps, and a game camera would be great too. Some areas in Colorado have cougars too, and that takes another level of security, like hot wire. Mary
     
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  5. Howlet

    Howlet Chillin' With My Peeps

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    i was just listing what came 2 mind.
     
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  6. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    Living in the city does not exempt you from predators. It could be a cat, coon, fox, coyote, big cat, or neighborhood dog. Your neighbor's chicken could have been taken because the predator found them first. Once those are locked up or wiped out, it may move on to your place. Cats are not necessarily nocturnal. Like any animal that is primarily nocturnal, they are opportunists and will hunt or take prey when it's available.
     
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  7. keesmom

    keesmom Overrun With Chickens

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    If you free range, even in your small yard, you are susceptible to predator attacks. Opossum, raccoon, owl, hawk, fox and coyote are all possible suspects along with feral cats and dogs in urban settings.
     
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  8. bobbi-j

    bobbi-j Chicken Obsessed

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    Yep, when free ranging, it's not a matter of "if" but a matter of "when" something will find your chickens. This being said, I do free range, and am aware of the risks.
     
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  9. Cynthia 085

    Cynthia 085 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks guys!

    Yup they free range...mmm.... I guess that would make sense; since they free range they are more prone to being eaten or attacked by an animal. [​IMG]

    It is just that I don't have any dogs or cats or anything and the yard would be a waste not to have them running around. I am aware of the risks especially now that my neighbor lost one.

    I did not know this would be an issue. I never even though about it to be honest. I was just so happy to see them out in the yard free roaming that this never even crossed my mind.

    Thank you every one. I am new to chickens and learning a lot very quickly.

    Cynthia
     
  10. CrazyTalk

    CrazyTalk Chillin' With My Peeps

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    How tall of a fence are we talking here?

    In my experience - canines usually go under fences - or can leap them and you wouldn't really find any evidence on the fence... if the bird was actually dragged over the fence like your neighbor seems to be saying, we're looking at something like a bobcat, or some other climbing predator.
     
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