Songbird Rehabber Question!!!

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by chickensducks&agoose, Jun 13, 2011.

  1. chickensducks&agoose

    chickensducks&agoose Chillin' With My Peeps

    A friend of mine (really) found a bird on the road 4 days ago, blind, and it's eyes were swollen and crusty. She took the bird home. It's a small brown one, sparrow or finch. I told her to call a rehabber, but she was convinced she could manage it on her own. Anyway, she 'borrowed' my terramycin (that I had for a duck with an eye problem) and has been dosing this bird according to the internet. I think she's doing a fine job... BUT. As of today, she called and said that the less bad eye is almost all better, and the crustiness/swelling of the worse eye is mostly gone, but the eye looks cloudy... I told her that the bird is not necessarily blind, since my duck had a similar sounding cloudiness in her eye, and it turned out to be just that her extra eyelid was stuck in the 'up' position. Do birds like Finches and sparrows have the extra eyelid? Also, if it IS blind in that eye, can she really just let it go? What would a REAL rehabber do?



    ps. It's living in a shed, in a birdcage and is eating and drinking fine.
     
  2. Gardengirl 2011

    Gardengirl 2011 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 3, 2011
    Central Florida
    [​IMG] I don't know what a real rehabber would do. Why is she hesitant to call someone?
     
  3. xke4

    xke4 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 3, 2007
    Finches are susceptible to mycoplasmal conjunctivitis. In Canada, it is against the law for someone other than a licensed rehabber to care for injured or diseased songbirds. Note in this link that if treated, 3 antibiotics must be given simultaneously. I doubt she is doing that. I would be happy to look in my directory to see if there is a rehabber near her.
    http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,1607,7-153-10370_12150_12220-27089--,00.html

    Also, it is probably eating and drinking fine because it is in a cage and its food is close by and always in one place. It is most likely that it would starve in the wild if she lets it go.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2011
  4. fuzziebutt

    fuzziebutt Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 9, 2009
    Winfield
    I would dust it for mites or lice, and bring the birdcage and all in the house and keep it as a pet. Find out what the laws in your area are.
     
  5. chickensducks&agoose

    chickensducks&agoose Chillin' With My Peeps

    Ugh. She's not going to be happy. I think it's the kind of situation where she wanted it to be really easy... and it sounds a bit less easy. I'll pass on the info-Thanks. I'll let you know how it turns out!
     

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