Sour Crop or Cold

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by stressed823, Nov 5, 2013.

  1. stressed823

    stressed823 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 23, 2013
    In the last week I have notice that my 7 month old tom turkey Reggie has been making noises like he was getting a cold, like mucus in his throat ,but when I rubbed it he would start to burp and try to cough up something, and again it would sound like mucus. His poop has been white and runny, almost looks like water today.I, had given him Tylan yesterday only because I thought It could be respiratory infection, now I'm just not sure. I called the vet and the only suggestion was ACV in a pint of water.I could come up with that on my own. He would like to eat but I have been giving him very small amounts of pumpkin with oil in it just in case there is a blockage. The only things that have been different is that they have straw for bedding, the food I gave them this time was pellets instead of meatbird, and they have been eating some scratch grains and grass. I'm at my wits end, people think Im crazy because we have these guys as pets in the first place, but they are part of the family...So any body have any suggestions, I'm willing to try anything. Thanks
     
  2. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Was the `meat bird' crumbles? Had they had pelleted feed in the past? You could try some molasses on cornbread (might move things along), also scrambled/crushed hard boiled eggs and meal worms provide protein quickly. Do they have access to grit (driveway gravels, etc)?
    If there is no foul breath then try the eggs/meal worms. Is the crop hard/enlarged? (link to impacted crop info):
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/457391/impacted-crop-baseball-size-video-is-ready

    If this is the first bag of pelleted formulation - could be the problem - they have a hard time with any change (could be eating a lot of grass, etc. to make up for having no crumbles, for instance).

    Chart with grit sizes here: http://www.albc-usa.org/documents/turkeymanual/ALBCturkey-7.pdf

    I'd offer two water bowls - one with the ACV & one without - see which it drinks the most from - just don't want to interfere with intake.

    Also, just on the off chance it could be gape worm - take a look into `back' of throat with a good light.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2013
  3. stressed823

    stressed823 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 23, 2013
    Thanks for the info..Yes they have had pellets in the past but they just really didn't care for them so decided to stay with the crumbles, but had a half a bag of pellets left so decided to use them. They have a dish of grit so I know they are getting enough of that.I haven't noticed any odor from his mouth, and have tried to look in his mouth for gapeworms and there is nothing. There is a very small knot at his crop and when we rub that he starts with his mucusy cough.I don't want to make things worse by massaging it and I don't know if I should try to push it up or down. I have seen horror stories of impaction of the crop and it scares the crud out of me thinking something is slowly killing him. I think I will try the molasses. Does anyone think I should try an antibiotic in case it could be an URI or should I hold off? Who would think turkeys would be so difficult to raise, but we will keep moving on and do everything we can for Mr. Reggie and try to get him to feel better. Thanks for all the help.
    Quote:
     
  4. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Jan 27, 2007
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    Try the crushed hard boiled eggs & meal worms. And restart the crumbles. Could be something lodged in upper crop (other members have had items like cable ties/plastic wrappers/wood chips become lodged in upper GI tract - some did ok/some did not).

    Another item to try is partially skinned, tore-up grapes (get as much `skin' off as possible, this will provide a bit of fluid/slight acidity/sugar and they usually like to eat it. As droppings are mostly urea (white) & water the primary goal is to get some nutrition moving through the turk.

    If you have some Nystatin on hand (oral suspension) the grape segments can be dipped in that (as a prophylactic antifungal treatment). Same is true with the systemic antibiotic (though I'd hold off as this will suppress both beneficial & pathogenic bacteria - & you don't know if this is bacterial - maybe use as a hail mary if turk fades).

    It is easy to get attached to these guys. We've dealt with Spraddle Leg/Severe Fowl Pox & surgery for removal of Chondrosarcomas. However, compared to the health issues with the cats, the turks have been trouble free and they've been far more entertaining and loyal.

    Let us know how it is going. Am hopeful other members will have better suggestions for you.

    Hang in there!
     

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