SOUR CROP??? Please HELP!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by GAFarmGirl87, Aug 15, 2013.

  1. GAFarmGirl87

    GAFarmGirl87 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 27, 2013
    NW Georgia
    My chickens are about 7 months old. A couple of weeks ago I noticed one of my hens had a large breast that hung down. I didn't think anything of it at first, I thought she was just a little overweight. I'm a newbie, so I didn't think it was serious. Anyway, I finally called a fellow chicken-keeper, and she told me it sounded like a crop issue. After checking on Google, I've determined it's sour crop, based on the fact the mass in her crop is squishy & she has a foul odor.

    Other symptoms include lethargy, strange head movements, and the fact she stays laid down whenever the rooster mounts her.
    My chickens have a large run, and I hardly every let them out to free range, except for an hour in the evenings a couple times a month. I don't feed them grass clippings. They get their layer feed, plus scratch & some fresh fruits & veggies. They also have sand in their run when they use as grit. I'm not sure how this happened.

    After researching this, my initial plan is to separate her from the flock, withhold food for 24 hours, and feed her ACV water with a dropper. Then, massage the crop and attempt to get her to vomit.

    Please, can someone please tell me if this is a good plan, and if not, what should I do instead?? I can't afford to take her to the vet or buy expensive medicines. I can only do natural remedies to help her. I don't want to see her suffer.

    Advice please!!!
     
  2. Veer67

    Veer67 Chillin' With My Peeps

  3. happyhens1972

    happyhens1972 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 24, 2013
    Not sure what's in that link, there's too much to go through right now but my cure....never failed yet....is to regularly empty the crop until it ceases to produce the excess fluid...at least two or three times a day. I do this by holding the bird upside down while stretching her neck out as straight as possible and putting gentle stroking pressure from the base (now at the top as she is upside down) to the top of her crop. It is very important that this is done as quickly as possible to ensure she does not then struggle to breathe and accidentally inhale the sour fluid as this could cause sever lung issues. It may take a few brief tries to empty it out in each 'session'. This is better than one prolonged attempt for the above reasons.

    In addition to the regular emptying, I feed a mixture of scrambled egg, natural yoghurt, garlic and canary vitamins....as much as she will eat, as often as she will eat it. I will also add bread softened in yoghurt as long as she has had a good amount of the egg. It is important not to give any solid/hard food whilst she is still producing the excess fluid. Once things start to be less fluidy and she appears to be 'on the up', you can slowly start adding layers pellets into the egg and yoghurt mix until she has recovered, then swap back to layers only.

    As for the cause in the first place, it could have been something as simple as some scratch that didn't pass through or a piece of fruit or veg too big to pass. It is advisable to use proper grit rather than sand as sand is too fine to do a sufficient job on particularly coarse or fibrous foods. If you pop a bowlful of grit in the coop, they will help themselves as and when they need it.

    Good luck with your little lady hon and obviously this method is what I use personally, there are lots of methods, this is just what I have found to work x
     
  4. GAFarmGirl87

    GAFarmGirl87 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you all for your replies. Unfortunately, I was too late. My girl died in my arms on Friday afternoon. This isn't the first chicken I've lost, but it was so hard watching her die in my hands.[​IMG]I tried emptying out her crop, but there was so much, that she couldn't get it all out, and she choked. I cried like a baby.

    I've definitely learned from this experience. I was completely ignorant of chicken illnesses, so it's my own fault for not noticing the issue sooner. It's likely I could've saved her if I had acted sooner.
     
  5. happyhens1972

    happyhens1972 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I am so, so sorry hon. It's hurts so much when we lose our feathered friends, huh?

    Sadly, sourcrop is quite a common killer and needs to be dealt with as soon as possible for a favourable outcome. Maybe it is worth you doing a little research on the most common complaints....egg binding, sourcrop, parasite control etc so that if anything else comes up, you'll know what to look for.....though, whatever the complaint, the signs of illness are usually very similar....lethargy, an inclination to separate from the flock, drooped tail and/or wings, loss of colour in comb and wattles, lack of appetite. WEven if you don't immediately know the problem, you'll at least know there is one if you spot these signs and can then act to discover what it is.

    Sorry again for your loss. Big hugs x
     
  6. GAFarmGirl87

    GAFarmGirl87 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you! I am certainly doing the research now, and watching my girls more closely.
     

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