Sour Dough Bread... an adventure.

Discussion in 'Egg, Chicken, & Other Favorite Recipes' started by vfem, Jan 24, 2011.

  1. vfem

    vfem Yoga...The Chicken Pose

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    So I love sour dough, and have failed from people walking me through it. Then I learn its all about the 'starter'. Some families have starters they've been using for GENERATIONS!? Seriously, hanging on to a starter solution for like 30 years.

    Someone once told me about using an old bowl you previously made bread dough in that you don't wash. So I made bread this morning, and I didn't wash the bowl. So tonight I made my first starter. Maybe my daughter will use the same starter I start with in 20 years?! I like the idea... so I'm going with it.

    Here's the recipe we're going to begin our adventure with.

    Sourdough Starter:

    2 cups warm water
    1 Tbsp sugar
    1 packet of active dry yeast (not the instant)
    2 cups of flour

    Add yeast to water and let sit for 10 minutes.

    Mix in flour with a wooden spoon scrapping the side.

    Store in a large glass of plastic bowl with a piece of plastic wrap on top. Place in a warm dark spot for 3-4 days.

    Apparently this will sour the mixture.

    Then when ready to bake use all the starter accept for 1 cup you set aside to 'feed' and start a new starter batch.

    For the new starter batch add 2 cups of warm water and 2 more cups of flour. This can be stored in the fridge at this point, just remember to bring to room temp before using in your next batch of sour dough bread.

    My next post will be with pictures of the starter. Then the bread recipe & bread I make.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2011
  2. BettyR

    BettyR Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Growing up my mother, grandmother, aunts and so on all made their own bread; I thought everyone did. When I went to school I was fairly shocked to learn that other people bought their bread from the store. So I learned at a very early age how to make bread, but we all used yeast bought from the store. After I was married a few years, I heard about sour dough and I decided to try it but I never really got a good starter going. My starters all died and I never really got one going well enough to actually use it to make bread. I would try, fail, give up and go back to store bought yeast. This cycle went on for years, then I came across this blog http://yumarama.com/blog/968/starter-from-scratch-intro/ and now I'm a happy sour dough baker. I still use regular yeast for some of my bread but now if I want sour dough I have a starter that will actually make bread.
     
  3. QH Girl

    QH Girl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Betty, that's a really interesting take on sour dough starter. Have you tried it with AP flour or does it need the whole wheat?
     
  4. miss_thenorth

    miss_thenorth Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 28, 2007
    SW Ont, Canada
    I have successfully started SD several times. I use a ratio of three parts flour to two parts water. OF the three parts flour, at first, I do one part rye flour, two parts whole wheat flour. Feed your starter twice a day, alway removing half before feeding it. Once your starter has bubbled and doubledconsistently for several days, ( it will take a bit) then slowly start to replace the rye/WW flour with white. that might take about a week. Once it is bubbling and doubling it is ready to bake with.

    SD has nothing to do with the wild yeasts in the air. It is the unrefined flour-whhich is why you start it with WW and rye. Rye four is necessary for a successful starter.
     
  5. BettyR

    BettyR Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:I use home ground whole wheat. I have never tried it with AP flour.

    Edited to add: I am talking about getting the starter going. Once it's going you can feed it whatever you like, AP flour would be fine. But to start you need a whole grain, organic would be best. If you don't bake with home ground whole wheat then it would probably be best to buy a small bag or box of organic whole wheat flour from a health food store to get started, some people use rye but I don't like rye so I never have any.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2011
  6. vfem

    vfem Yoga...The Chicken Pose

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    Now I did my starter with AP flour as it didn't have a listed suggestion. I don't have rye... but I do have whole wheat organic I keep on hand. Should I start over, or do you think this starter will be fine?

    Betty, I found that article interesting! I don't know how well I could collect my natural yeasts here though... I don't know if we have the correct conditions right now?
     
  7. BettyR

    BettyR Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Since there are records of people cooking bread using wild yeast in ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs, my first guess would be that your living conditions are more advanced than that and you would do just fine. The yeast spoors are in the flour, not in the air. I would keep the starter I have and start another one. If the one you have started with the yeast survives and you get another one started with wild yeast you will have two flavors to choose from. You could keep your favorite and discard the other of use both for slightly difference in flavors. Just have fun with it.

    But I would suggest that you read the blog very carefully and follow the steps exactly.

    Edited to add: I would use the pineapple formula...it works much better.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2011
  8. halo

    halo Got The Blues

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    What makes sour dough bread- the finished product- different from regular home baked bread with yeast?
     
  9. BettyR

    BettyR Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Most people like it because of the slightly sour flavor and the chewy texture of the crumb but there are those who believe that it is healthier for you. I'm in the flavor camp, if it turns out that it's healthier then that's great too.
     
  10. flyweed

    flyweed Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OOohh..a thread I know alot about. I have baking sour dough bread for at least 10-15 years now, I fell in love with it ever since my wife and I took a trip out to San Fran and visited a wonderful seafood resaturant, where we had fresh clam chowder with sourdough bread.

    What causes the "sour" in the bread is actually the temperature you allow the dough to rise at. My first starter came from the King Arthur's Bread company..they sell a small amount of their starter that is over 250 years old. WHen you first prepare your dough you leave it out for 4-6 hours and then refrigerate overnight. this helps increase both the lactic and acetic acids, which give sourdough it's flavor.

    When you start a new sourdough starter from scratch..you should create the starter then let it sit in the fridge for a few weeks or longer before attempting to use it.

    I can give more info if you wish. Just let me know.

    Dan
     

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