Southern Cali sustainability starter help

ChiknGordonBlu

Chirping
Mar 31, 2020
84
85
53
Ramona, CA
Hey all, so my family and I have embarked on a mission to be most self sufficient. We dont have too much usable land as the majority of it is mountain, the other section is a corral. We will be doing mostly raised beds scattered about I think. We started off with chickens and we have them up and running now and I am trying to turn focus on gardening. That being said we just moved out to this state a year ago, does anybody have any ideas of easy plants for us to get started on this region? Also what all plants does everybody prefer and what kind of animals do you all think would be good for a small starter homestead like ours? All opinions welcome and appreciated. TIA
 

AgnesGray

Crowing
Mar 8, 2019
1,106
3,368
386
Ohio, US
My Coop
My Coop
Can't help with the plant suggestions, but good luck with your homestead! I like Youtube homestead channels and enjoy getting ideas from them. If you can find one in your area, even better. Good luck to you!
 

ChiknGordonBlu

Chirping
Mar 31, 2020
84
85
53
Ramona, CA
Can't help with the plant suggestions, but good luck with your homestead! I like Youtube homestead channels and enjoy getting ideas from them. If you can find one in your area, even better. Good luck to you!
Hi, thank you very much. I will have to check and see if there is anything on thee for my area. :thumbsup
 

OlympicChick

🌞East of the Sun and West of the Moon🌝
Sep 22, 2018
424
814
217
Bremerton, WA
My Coop
My Coop
I don't know if you have access to logs, but if you do you can make the raised beds out of them. That is what we are doing. I will post photos of ours in a little bit.
 

OlympicChick

🌞East of the Sun and West of the Moon🌝
Sep 22, 2018
424
814
217
Bremerton, WA
My Coop
My Coop
We are basically doing a hugelculture/lasagna bed thing. We won't be really using these raised beds until next year. What you see in them right now is logs on the bottom, and coffee grounds. We'll be piling in horse manure, dirt and green stuff like leaves, and green pine needles. We try to use older wood that is already partially decomposed from fallen trees. It acts like a sponge that retains water. This is the first time we are doing this with hugelculture, but I've had success with lasagna beds before and I think this will work out well.
IMG_1401.jpeg
 

ChiknGordonBlu

Chirping
Mar 31, 2020
84
85
53
Ramona, CA
We are basically doing a hugelculture/lasagna bed thing. We won't be really using these raised beds until next year. What you see in them right now is logs on the bottom, and coffee grounds. We'll be piling in horse manure, dirt and green stuff like leaves, and green pine needles. We try to use older wood that is already partially decomposed from fallen trees. It acts like a sponge that retains water. This is the first time we are doing this with hugelculture, but I've had success with lasagna beds before and I think this will work out well.
View attachment 2174256
Wow, that look like a really cool idea. I hope that works out for you, it would look really nice. My area unfortunately is pretty much free of and reasonable sized trees, the area had a fire back in 2009 so things are still pretty small tree wise. I get pretty much free unlimited crates from my work that I think we will use as the raised beds. Free is good lol :D
 

quone

In the Brooder
Feb 8, 2020
37
71
46
Thousand Oaks, CA
I’ve had really good luck with tomatoes as long as they get lots of water. Cucumbers get bitter, but do better with lots of water. Blackberries have gone crazy! 5 years after planting 2 vines, I have an area that’s 4’ x 30’ and last year made 5 pies, 3 quarts fresh berries in the freezer, scones, muffins, 2 pints jam, and lots just eaten off the vines. This year it’s not as good, but I didn’t give them extra water. Basil and cilantro bolt really fast. I have LOTS of pill bugs and slugs that I use diatomaceous earth for. Lots of lizards, too.
Welcome to SoCal! Good luck!
 

ChiknGordonBlu

Chirping
Mar 31, 2020
84
85
53
Ramona, CA
I’ve had really good luck with tomatoes as long as they get lots of water. Cucumbers get bitter, but do better with lots of water. Blackberries have gone crazy! 5 years after planting 2 vines, I have an area that’s 4’ x 30’ and last year made 5 pies, 3 quarts fresh berries in the freezer, scones, muffins, 2 pints jam, and lots just eaten off the vines. This year it’s not as good, but I didn’t give them extra water. Basil and cilantro bolt really fast. I have LOTS of pill bugs and slugs that I use diatomaceous earth for. Lots of lizards, too.
Welcome to SoCal! Good luck!
Yeah I have heard from many people that they area is good for growing. we are still new at it and I just hope we get something out of this year vegetable wise. I am currently in the process of getting things together to start building some Hugelkulturs for next year and see how that works.
 

humblehillsfarm

Crowing
Mar 27, 2020
3,165
6,014
431
Southwestern Pennsylvania
My Coop
My Coop
We are basically doing a hugelculture/lasagna bed thing. We won't be really using these raised beds until next year. What you see in them right now is logs on the bottom, and coffee grounds. We'll be piling in horse manure, dirt and green stuff like leaves, and green pine needles. We try to use older wood that is already partially decomposed from fallen trees. It acts like a sponge that retains water. This is the first time we are doing this with hugelculture, but I've had success with lasagna beds before and I think this will work out well.
View attachment 2174256
I was going to mention hugulculture. If you're in CA I imagine drought is an issue? There was an AWESOME episode on Homestead Rescue where they featured Hugulculture. Next thing is look for plants that mature within your growing seasons, and if it's a HOT season, make sure they are relatively heat tollerant as well. If you're hugulculture is successful, than needing drought tolerant plants shouldn't be an issue.
 

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