Sparring Chicks - OH NO.

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by mckngbrd, Jun 15, 2016.

  1. mckngbrd

    mckngbrd Out Of The Brooder

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    So i have 7 babies (almost a month old). Supposedly BUFF BRAHMAS, but i highly doubt it based on pictures I've seen.

    Up till now they have been pretty mellow, except one which we suspect MIGHT be a rooster. In the last few days they have stepped up the sparring. This morning when i had them out of the Dog Crate (it's a large one with plenty of roosts) they really started going at it. It was the first time i'd seen them actually make contact and pull at each other instead of small nips. It wasn't the possibly rooster making the fuss either.

    Scary. Is this normal? We love them so much.

    The crate is for a large dog...I can't imagine what could be bigger unless we built something. Unfortunately we are trying desperately to get the coop and run finished so its taking up all our time...

    Any words of wisdom or comfort would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Pullets as well as cockerels will flair hackles and spar with one another. I think it's combination play/pecking order.
     
  3. TheKindaFarmGal

    TheKindaFarmGal Chicken Obsessed

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    Added to what Sourland said, you might want to post pictures of your chickens in the What Breed or Gender is this? forum where we can tell you what you have. They might not be old enough yet, but we can give it a shot. [​IMG]
     
  4. azygous

    azygous True BYC Addict

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    When talking about odds, your chances are greater that sparring between chicks indicates cockerels. It is slightly greater than their being simply pullets goofing around.

    There are other signs as well, that also indicate a greater chance of having a cockerel that both sexes may engage in, such as tid-bitting, hyperactive behavior and longer, thicker legs.

    These indicators are merely a signal to be on the lookout for the real signs that you have a cockerel - red comb, emerging saddle pin feathers under the existing back feathers, the sudden appearance of a sickle feather emerging from the tail, and a squeaky attempt at crowing.
     
  5. Donna R Raybon

    Donna R Raybon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have seen two hens go at one another with just as much flair and finesse as any two roosters. I have also seen an old hen whip the fire out of a huge new rooster who was being less than a gentleman, too. She was half his size and tore him a new one. I have notice since he is nicer to hens.
     

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