Special instructions for hatching shipped eggs

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by blaines.insane, Dec 30, 2008.

  1. blaines.insane

    blaines.insane Out Of The Brooder

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    Dec 26, 2008
    SW Utah
    This is my first time incubating, let alone incubating shipped eggs... so needless to say, I'm nervous. But I didn't spend any more than I can bear to lose if it doesn't work out...

    Anyway, some time ago when I first started shopping for eggs, I came across a wonderful article that gave excellent instructions for hatching shipped eggs. I thought I had bookmarked the page, but apparently I didn't.

    What special instructions do I need to know to prepare for, and then incubate eggs that have been shipped? My eggs will be arriving tomorrow via express mail.

    From what I remember, there is a period of time that you have to let the eggs rest after you get them (is it 24 or 48 hours?). They should be held at a certain temp (55 - 65 degrees???) and turned at least once a day? Then before you put them in the incubator, you bring them slowly up to room temp?

    And what about the details? Most eggs, it seems, come wrapped in bubble wrap and other creative paraphernalia. Do you leave them in that until just before you put them in the incubator? Or do you unwrap them as soon as you get them and put them in an egg carton or tray? What do you do in dry parts of the country where humidity levels are normally very low? I don't know what normal humidity is like inside the house here. It's going to be a challenge to find a place inside where it is 55 - 65 degrees and whatever % humidty. How can I create that space artificially? In an ice chest with a pan of ice at the other end? Is it really that critical?

    The reason I ask is, last summer my friend wanted some fertile eggs from me and I just put them in an egg carton and put them in the pantry (about 74 - 76 degrees constant, and very low humidty). They were out in the nest box for as long as a day, maybe day and a half before that. She forgot to stop by and grab them, and they were in there for 7 or 8 days. During that time, I only remembered to turn the carton at most 3 times. They all hatched, and are living normal healthy lives. But those eggs weren't shipped... so maybe that's the difference?

    Thanks for any help,

    Blaine
     
  2. spookyevilone

    spookyevilone Crazy Quail Lady

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    Oct 5, 2008
    Minneapolis
    blaines.insane :

    This is my first time incubating, let alone incubating shipped eggs... so needless to say, I'm nervous. But I didn't spend any more than I can bear to lose if it doesn't work out...

    Anyway, some time ago when I first started shopping for eggs, I came across a wonderful article that gave excellent instructions for hatching shipped eggs. I thought I had bookmarked the page, but apparently I didn't.

    What special instructions do I need to know to prepare for, and then incubate eggs that have been shipped? My eggs will be arriving tomorrow via express mail.

    From what I remember, there is a period of time that you have to let the eggs rest after you get them (is it 24 or 48 hours?). They should be held at a certain temp (55 - 65 degrees???) and turned at least once a day? Then before you put them in the incubator, you bring them slowly up to room temp?

    And what about the details? Most eggs, it seems, come wrapped in bubble wrap and other creative paraphernalia. Do you leave them in that until just before you put them in the incubator? Or do you unwrap them as soon as you get them and put them in an egg carton or tray? What do you do in dry parts of the country where humidity levels are normally very low? I don't know what normal humidity is like inside the house here. It's going to be a challenge to find a place inside where it is 55 - 65 degrees and whatever % humidty. How can I create that space artificially? In an ice chest with a pan of ice at the other end? Is it really that critical?

    The reason I ask is, last summer my friend wanted some fertile eggs from me and I just put them in an egg carton and put them in the pantry (about 74 - 76 degrees constant, and very low humidty). They were out in the nest box for as long as a day, maybe day and a half before that. She forgot to stop by and grab them, and they were in there for 7 or 8 days. During that time, I only remembered to turn the carton at most 3 times. They all hatched, and are living normal healthy lives. But those eggs weren't shipped... so maybe that's the difference?

    Thanks for any help,

    Blaine

    You're thinking of storage, not incubating. To store eggs, they need to be kept between 55-65F so they don't start gestation. They'll stay dormant.

    When you get shipped eggs, unwrap the eggs, put them big end up in an egg carton, or on their side (I like big end up), and let them sit out at least 24 hours to bring them to room temp - more if they're especially chilly when you get them. Then put them in the 'bator.

    You don't want to put cold eggs in a warm 'bator because they'll sweat and the temperature shock can kill the blastocyst.

    The difference for shipped eggs is that they can be subjected to temperature changes or cold cargo holds if they're overnighted/air shipped. You want the internal temp of the egg to stabilize to room temp before putting in the 'bator.

    If you want to store them a few days when you get them while your 'bator regulates, then yes, keep them between 55-65, large end up in an egg carton, and turn at least twice a day. For humidity, put a chunk of damp sponge in the egg carton with them. If your house isn't really super evil dry, you shouldn't need the sponge. If it's dry enough that the inside of your nose feels like it's about to crack and bleed, or been sand blasted, you probably want to raise the humidity - try putting a kettle of water near a heat register or boiling some water on the stove just to get the steam in the air. Or buy a humidifier.

    Hope that helps!
    -Spooky​
     
  3. blaines.insane

    blaines.insane Out Of The Brooder

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    0
    32
    Dec 26, 2008
    SW Utah
    Most excellently, Spooky... Thanks for clearing that up for me. Living the in the desert southwest, the inside of my nose always feels like it's been sandblasted. LOL! I think I still have a working humidifier around here somewhere...

    I'm going to incubate in the pantry, since that room stays the most constant in temp. It is centrally located in the basement, and has no windows or HVAC ducts. I'm guessing that room stays a fairly constant 68 - 70. In fact, I just checked the thermo in the 'bator, which has been in there for a week now, and it's reading exactly 70 degrees. I'll make sure to keep the pantry door open for air circulation.

    If anyone sees a problem with my plans, please let me know. I can hardly wait to get my eggs tomorrow!

    Blaine
     
  4. shelleyd2008

    shelleyd2008 the bird is the word

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    Sep 14, 2008
    Adair Co., KY
    One more thing, I have noticed that they seem to do better if you don't mess with them much. They get enough rough handling during shipping. I would recommend that you candle once, day 10-14, and then once you move them to the hatcher. Of course, you want to candle them before you set them, to make sure there are no cracks. Letting them rest also helps the air sac stabilize, as it will get jostled around a lot during shipping. Good luck!
     
  5. hatchcrazzzy

    hatchcrazzzy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 8, 2007
    kemp texas

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