Speckled Sussex roo and Welsummer hen

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by Deltabwa, Apr 10, 2017.

  1. Deltabwa

    Deltabwa Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had a chick hatch, just this morning, and it's a SS/Wel cross. I know that the Wel's are autosexing but what happens when they cross? And do the crosses typically take on the hens' genetics? I know it's a technical issue, But just wondered.

    Does anyone have this cross and would want to share their pics :)
     
  2. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    I’m not familiar with that cross so can’t help you much there. The Speckling (mottling) is a recessive trait so it will not show up on the first generation. The chicks should all be red, I can’t go beyond that.

    In genetics there are typically two genes at any point on the DNA with both males and females. As always with chicken genetics there are exceptions, the sex linked genes, but those are pretty insignificant in this case so to simplify let’s forget about those. Each parent gives one copy from that gene pair to all their offspring. Some of those genes are dominant, some recessive, some partially dominant, some only act if another certain gene is present. It can get pretty complicated pretty fast.

    But to answer your specific question, it does not matter which parent the gene comes from. The hen does not have more influence than the rooster. Ignoring the sex linked genes the rooster does not have more influence than the hen. What matters are what genes the chick inherits and how they work together, not which parent the genes come from.
     
  3. Deltabwa

    Deltabwa Chillin' With My Peeps

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    oh poo. lol i like the speckling.

    Ok, I get that. Whichever is dominant wins. I crossed a Barred roo with a black NN hen. The hen had front neck feathers that were orange/red laced. The rest of her was black. The offspring is a black NN with white lace on her neck feathers. I thought the barred was dominant. But like people, I suppose, it's dominance. I just wasn't sure about autosexing. That sure would be nice. But it is a bit more aggressive and it's comb is already kind of big.
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    A pure barred roo over a black hen will produce barred chicks. I’m willing to bet the roo was not pure for the barring gene. That is a sex linked gene so the hen only has one copy, but a male has two genes at that spot on the DNA. Barred is dominant so if only one of those genes is barred, he will be barred. But if he happened to give the gene that is not barred to that chick, the chick will not be barred.
     
  5. Deltabwa

    Deltabwa Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Yea, he wasn't pure I don't believe. Thought I put an "X" in that post, sorry. But still thought the bar would be dominant over all. but I guess not. He is here in this vid but has some red/orange in him https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1141687/roo-limping-for-2-weeks-suddenly-worse he's been dinner so it doesn't really matter anymore lol I am trying to post a pic but I don't seem to have the editor bar. ETA: edited for mistakes
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2017
  6. Deltabwa

    Deltabwa Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Here is the chick. Pretty cute. Does the eyeli e give a clue or is that a non issue still?

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  7. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    It does not help me.
     
  8. Deltabwa

    Deltabwa Chillin' With My Peeps

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    k thanks!
     

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