splash coloring

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by mario2girls, Feb 9, 2008.

  1. mario2girls

    mario2girls Chillin' With My Peeps

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    in any chicken breed in general,,,to get splash coloring is it as simple as breeding black to white? or is it something else?
    thanks, wendy
     
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    This is a passage from a website that explains how you get splash:

    Blue color is the result of a third gene. It is a modifying gene for black pigment, and is located at a parking spot called "Bl." The choices (alleles) that can go into this parking spot are basically black pigment (bl+ = black pigment allele) or a bleaching allele (Bl = blue allele, which really is the black pigment allele with a modifier that bleaches the black pigment). If you think of the blue allele (Bl) as a bleaching version, then you can visualize how if a bird gets one dose of blue allele (Bl,bl+), it turns out blue in color, and if a bird gets two doses of blue allele (Bl,Bl), it gets double-bleached all the way to splash. And the blue allele acts wherever there is black in the bird, so wherever the bird WOULD HAVE BEEN BLACK, it is now bleached either to blue, or all the way to splash, depending if it gets (one blue allele and one black pigment allele), or (two blue alleles).

    From this site: http://www.bevsmarans.com/breeding%20blues.htm

    Clear
    as mud, LOL?
    This boy came from breeding blue to blue:
    [​IMG]
     
  3. mario2girls

    mario2girls Chillin' With My Peeps

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    so in order to get the splash you need a blue gene,,,
    genetic,,,,,ohhh my head hurts,,,,lol
     
  4. Katy

    Katy Flock Mistress

  5. mario2girls

    mario2girls Chillin' With My Peeps

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    so if i breed black to white, i get mottled?
    maybe?? or a mess, maybe???

    oh and i love the thud face,,,my thoughts exactly..lol
     
  6. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    All I can tell you is what breeding blue to blue gets you, black to blue, blue to splash, etc. I'm no genetics genius, cant tell you why, just what you get when you breed what to what in the blue family.
     
  7. DougD

    DougD Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 30, 2007
    Blue to blue will give you approximately 50% blue, 25% splash, and 25% black.
    Blue to splash = 50% blue, 50% splash
    Black to splash = 100% blue
    Blue to black = 50% blue, 50% black

    In order to get splash you must use blue.
    Splash roosters like blue roosters will not be a solid color, they have various shades in different places on their bodies.
    Splash hens can range from a solid color to sort of a spangled mix of light blue/blue or allmost white/light blue.

    Black and white can give you several different results depending on what genes are underlying the black and whether the white is a dominant white or a recessive white. One thing it wont give you is splash.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2008
  8. mario2girls

    mario2girls Chillin' With My Peeps

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    well , thanks, i get it now,,,for splash i need the blue gene,,,
    i was wrong in my thinking,,,,
    i had bred a black rosedcomb with a white rosecomb and the chick is white with black spots and i wasnt sure what that would be called,,,, if anything,i thought splash,,i dont know why. but thank you all for clearing that up for me,,,
    wendy
     
  9. mario2girls

    mario2girls Chillin' With My Peeps

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    so the white gene in this white rosecomb then is dominant since the chick is white with black spots and not black with white spots,,,got it
    very interesting,
     
  10. Blisschick

    Blisschick not rusty

    Feb 20, 2007
    Shepherd, Texas
    If it's black with white spots, or just colors mingled together in no particular pattern, it's called mottled.
     

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