Spurs on Banty roosters

Iamahz57

In the Brooder
Sep 5, 2018
7
4
11
We have 2 Banty roosters, one of them needs their spurs cut real bad. The nearest Chicken Veterinary clinic is 200 miles away. I have found videos on "how to" for large roosters, not for these little guys. Ideas?
 

azygous

Crossing the Road
10 Years
Dec 11, 2009
18,227
21,857
912
Colorado Rockies
It really doesn't matter the size of the chicken, and I say "chicken" because I've removed and trimmed spurs on hens, too. The technique is the same.

Recently, I removed my older rooster's spurs using the hot potato method. This chicken is a bleeder, and in the past, removing his spurs involved a lot of blood. This isn't the norm. Usually, the outer sheath comes off and the soft nub that's left has only a pink serum slightly coating it, but no bleeding.

With the hot potato method, not only do the spurs twist off easier, but there is no bleeding either. I had been trimming this rooster's spurs for the past few years with a Dremmel, but they had grown to about three inches and were curving inward, a danger to him and to the hens he mated.

To do the hot potato method on a banty, I would cut the potato in half and heat one half at a time until it's steaming hot and cooked. stick the hot potato on the spur, careful not to touch it to the leg, and keep it there for about two minutes. Then take pliers and grab the spur close to the shank and twist back and forth slightly until the spur loosens. Then lift it off. I spray with Vetericyn.
 

Iamahz57

In the Brooder
Sep 5, 2018
7
4
11
It really doesn't matter the size of the chicken, and I say "chicken" because I've removed and trimmed spurs on hens, too. The technique is the same.

Recently, I removed my older rooster's spurs using the hot potato method. This chicken is a bleeder, and in the past, removing his spurs involved a lot of blood. This isn't the norm. Usually, the outer sheath comes off and the soft nub that's left has only a pink serum slightly coating it, but no bleeding.

With the hot potato method, not only do the spurs twist off easier, but there is no bleeding either. I had been trimming this rooster's spurs for the past few years with a Dremmel, but they had grown to about three inches and were curving inward, a danger to him and to the hens he mated.

To do the hot potato method on a banty, I would cut the potato in half and heat one half at a time until it's steaming hot and cooked. stick the hot potato on the spur, careful not to touch it to the leg, and keep it there for about two minutes. Then take pliers and grab the spur close to the shank and twist back and forth slightly until the spur loosens. Then lift it off. I spray with Vetericyn.
Do you know how long the the quick is?
 

azygous

Crossing the Road
10 Years
Dec 11, 2009
18,227
21,857
912
Colorado Rockies
It can vary. It's not guaranteed to be the same on every rooster. My rooster's quick is about 3/4 inch. If you go the route of trimming, I advise using a Dremmel grinding tool, not a cutting tool.

As you grind the spur down, going slowly, watch for a tiny circular variation begin to appear. That indicates you're getting close to the quick. With the grinding tool, going slowly, when you hit the quick, there will be a tiny dot of blood. Stop there. You're finished. You may need to dab some flour or corn starch on the tiny dot to stop the bleeding, but it's easier to do than if you blow it by cutting deep into the quick. It will take major first aid and bandaging, and it won't stop bleeding for days.

It's your choice. I've done both methods - grinding down and twisting off, and of the two, twist off is easier and lasts much longer.
 

Iamahz57

In the Brooder
Sep 5, 2018
7
4
11
It can vary. It's not guaranteed to be the same on every rooster. My rooster's quick is about 3/4 inch. If you go the route of trimming, I advise using a Dremmel grinding tool, not a cutting tool.

As you grind the spur down, going slowly, watch for a tiny circular variation begin to appear. That indicates you're getting close to the quick. With the grinding tool, going slowly, when you hit the quick, there will be a tiny dot of blood. Stop there. You're finished. You may need to dab some flour or corn starch on the tiny dot to stop the bleeding, but it's easier to do than if you blow it by cutting deep into the quick. It will take major first aid and bandaging, and it won't stop bleeding for days.

It's your choice. I've done both methods - grinding down and twisting off, and of the two, twist off is easier and lasts much longer.
Thank you for your help. This is the first time we have done this. We will use a dremmel tool and cut about an inch out.
 
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