Squishy body and running backwards

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Unclebean, Jun 13, 2011.

  1. Unclebean

    Unclebean Rest in Peace 1977-2013

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    Jun 10, 2010
    Tower City, PA
    We have a 2 month old chick that I noticed was only walking/running backwards this evening. I picked her up and she feels bloated all around her body kinda squishy feeling. Today our son was taking lemon peels to the compost bin and he gave some to the chickens. I've heard citrus is not safe for chickens. Could this be the problem? Any other ideas?
     
  2. rivers2011

    rivers2011 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 12, 2011
    Port Perry, ON
    wow, that sounds like...one of the oddest problems i've ever heard of...but I sincerely wish you and your chick the best. I'm sure someone around here will have an answer!
     
  3. poseygrace

    poseygrace Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 29, 2011
    Georgia
    Wow, that is weird. Sorry I don't have any answers, just wanted to wish you good luck in your quest. Hope the chicky makes it!
     
  4. lewishe

    lewishe Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 5, 2011
    [​IMG] Here's a bump to keep your question up
     
  5. rivers2011

    rivers2011 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 12, 2011
    Port Perry, ON
    Hi UncleBean,
    I just did a google search and found the following info:
    from http://www.bar.gov.ph/agritech/Livestock/AGRITECH%20LIVESTOCK/CHICKEN/chicken_materials.htm.asp
    COMMON
    DISEASES OF POULTRY

    Avian Pest (Newcastle Disease)
    Cause:Virus
    Transmission: Contact with the nasal and mouth discharge from infected birds
    - Through the polluted air and contaminated equipment
    - Through the mechanical means such as being carried bu sparrows (maya), predators, or other birds
    - Human beings transmit the disease through infected clothes and shoes
    Signs :In young birds, gasping, coughing, rattling of the windpipe, hoarse chirping, paralysis, walking backward and circling
    - In adults, coughing occasional paralysis, abrupt drop in egg production, soft-shelled eggs, greenish watery diarrhea
    Prevention: Vaccination. Consult your veterinarian for a program suited to your operation
    Treatment: There is no treatment for the disease. In case of an outbreak, the following measures could be adopted to minimize its further spread and effect control of the disease
    - isolate sick birds quickly
    - quarantine the area by regulating human traffic from disease-affected premises to other farms as well as from poultry house to poultry house on the same farm
    - Revaccination of the exposed and apparently healthy portion of the flock, if the protective titer (detected by serological test) is already low.
    - Thoroughly disinfect the houses and premises. Allow to dry before occupancy
    - Bury deeply or burn dead birds

    from http://poultrykeeper.com/silkie/the-silkie/diseases-common-to-silkies.html
    The
    best silkies are those with a dome on their skull which produces an excellent crest although this is often quite alarming when seen in chicks as it appears as a large bump on top of the head - quite disconcerting to new breeders!
    Is a particular problem with, although not limited to, some of the crested breeds and is often mistaken for Marek’s disease. An infection in the enlarged cranial cavity produces fluid which in turn presses on the brain. Symptoms include walking backwards and falling over. The bird may spin around in circles then suddenly recover, much to the misguided amusement of the keeper. Treatment is simple and effective: isolate the bird and administer a liquid feed (pellets ground up with water) via a large syringe directly into the mouth at regular (two to four hour) intervals during the day, with the last feed at night. An antibiotic preparation needs to be prescribed by your vet and injected into the breast muscle along with an anti inflammatory drug (ask your vet to show you how if you are unsure) to reduce the swelling and clear up the infection. You may have to continue treatment for up to four weeks in mild cases however severe cases should be euthanized if there is no marked improvement after one week or if the bird is in considerable distress.

    from http://www.gameconsultancy.co.uk/game-bird-services/diseases.html
    Ataxia
    Pheasant
    ataxia is a neurological condition of pheasants. It is an important differential diagnose of Newcastle Disease (ND), which is notifiable. The nature of the lesions made one suspect the cause of the disease is a virus although a specific virus has not been found yet. Usually presents in poults 8 weeks or older. Affected birds show imbalance, walk backwards. These symptoms could progress to circling, leg paralysis and eventually lateral recumbency.
     
  6. Unclebean

    Unclebean Rest in Peace 1977-2013

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    Jun 10, 2010
    Tower City, PA
    This morning she is walking normal [​IMG] but she she still seems bloated. I'll keep her isolated from the flock and keep an eye on her. I'll keep you posted and thank you!
     

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