starting seeds

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by bugkiller, Mar 22, 2013.

  1. bugkiller

    bugkiller Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Aug 24, 2011
    ontario
    Just looking for some help. I have never started my oun plants from seed and want to give it a go. I plant tomatos, peppers, egg plant,and a few others from plants that i buy. Is it too late to start them now. I plant in the garden usaly 3rd week of may depending on weather. also is a light a must. I like the idea of starting my own but if it is going to be 100's of dollars to invest i am not sure it is worth it. any advise would be great.
    Norm
     
  2. fried green eggs

    fried green eggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 25, 2011
    S.E. Michigan
    You just reminded me - someone posted on the site last year that they use their incubator to start seed and said it only took a few days to see them sprouting. My hatcher isn't in use so, I think I will get some seeds this weekend and give it ago. [​IMG]
     
  3. UnlabeledMama

    UnlabeledMama Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 9, 2012
    Western North Carolina
    Neat idea!

    We started some seeds in our dining room 2 weeks ago and some more last week. Yes, we have "that house". [​IMG] We have more to do, but we haven't gotten all our seeds yet. So far the bok choi and tomatoes are sprouting and there is a hint of some leeks as well! It's very exciting!
     
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  4. fried green eggs

    fried green eggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 25, 2011
    S.E. Michigan
    I got a few seeds today and a large reusable starting tray. I am also going to do a couple experiments - I have some plastic egg cartons and I think they will work for starting seeds in and I broke some eggs to use as compost-able pots. Most of the seeds say seedlings emerge in 10-14 days. I am hoping the incubator speeds up the process.
     
  5. bockbock2008

    bockbock2008 Why do they call me crazy??

    Dec 30, 2008
    Southwest Indiana
    The incubator will speed up the process all right but make sure you check thier moisture EVERY day as that will also dry them out quicker. I'm not a big fan of peat pots either. They also tend to dry out quicker and form a nice layer of mold on the exterior of the pot. [​IMG] I have about 80 tomato plants in my dining room right now. Our last anticipated frost date is April 10th but we are under a winter storm advisory right now so who knows when I will get to put them out. I started these seeds on March 8th. I have a 288 cell starting tray I use and then transplant when they are getting their first set of real leaves. That tray is the size of a regular flat so I can plant alot of stuff and see what takes of as I harvest quite a few of my own seeds.
     
  6. bockbock2008

    bockbock2008 Why do they call me crazy??

    Dec 30, 2008
    Southwest Indiana
    It is definately not too late. I'd go ahead and start the eggplant and peppers now and wait until the first week of April to start the tomatoes. Also cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower can be started now as they like the cooler temps. I don't have a grow light but they do make for stronger, less "leggy" plants. I have a big south facing window and set up a table between my table and the window and turn them everyday. As stated before, I'd advise against peat pots. The egg cartons will work at first, but I'd think they aren't deep enough for the entire life of the plant before transplant. If you have a really, really dry seed starting medium and plant the seeds before you water, they will float to the top so use a spray bottle until all the dirt is moist and has a grip on those seeds, especially tomato seeds. It's lots of work but lots of fun and very rewarding when you are harvesting crops that you started yourself.
     
  7. fried green eggs

    fried green eggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't think I have to worry about them drying out any time soon. There is so much condensation in the incubator right now that there are big water drops all over the windows. I had the humidity up to 75% before I put the seed tray in. I made sure all the peat disk were fully drenched before I planted the seeds. I have not used the peat pots before so, I thought I would give them a try. I have topsoil and my mom has old 4 plant tray to transplant the egg carton little plants to - when they come out of the incubator. My husband ask me what I am going to do with almost 100 plants when I take them out of the incubator. It will be awhile before they can go outside. I have two garage brooders and I may see if I can get a grow light to put in one of them? Maybe I could mount a grow light to the inside top so, I can make the brooder dual purpose? I don't have any big south window in my house that I can put the plants in front of until they can go outside. Who knows when warm enough weather will get here this Spring?
     
  8. FlySammyJ

    FlySammyJ Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 25, 2013
    Montana
    Lighting depends on how long you want to keep them inside, really. In the frozen North, I've had to putt of planting by several weeks, and even in a SW-facing corner window with many hours of light each day, without a bulb some of my plants became so spindly and leggy they just fell over and died. After nursing them for a couple of months it was pretty disheartening. A light setup doesn't have to be expensive, I repurposed mine from a terrarium and now I don't loose any more plants to legginess. This year I'm also introducing cold-frames into my system to provide a sort of decompression between the comfy house and the windy, cold garden so hardening off isn't such a trauma.
     
  9. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    We garden for market and there's little profit if we have to buy set plants. We grow everything on tables in front of windows on the south facing side of the house. Yes, it over takes the house for a few weeks, but it is our surest sign of spring. LOL

    No, it is not too late. This is the proper time to start for our growing season, which is comparable to yours. I use all re-cycled plastic pots that guy at the garbage transfer station picks for me. I re-cycle all the small cells, the small pots, the medium pots, the large pots.

    I make the potting soil as well. It's just bark and poop and rotted straw and rotted leaves and our own soil all composted together. My wife got weary of my suspending the shop lights from her curtain rods, so this year I made pvc "goal posts" to hand the shop lights from.


    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]


    That's about 100 green pepper plants, with another 40 to follow as well as 200 tomato plants to be planted over the next two weeks.
    As you can see, there's still lots of snow outside. No spring in sight.
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2013
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  10. uphilljill

    uphilljill Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 14, 2012
    Southern Adirondacks, NY
    I'd think for Ontario, you'd be right on schedule to start them this week. You can get a Jiffy or Burpee 72 cell seed flat for $6-8 bucks from Home Depot or Tractor Supply-type places. Probably the easiest way to start out. If you don't have a good south facing window (or don't fancy seed trays in your dining room lol) you can use a clamp light or two with a florescent bulb. We also recycle plastic containers when the seedlings are ready to be repotted... Just make sure you clean them well first. Happy planting!
     

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