Still-air Hova Bator temperature question

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by LadyShred, Apr 8, 2009.

  1. LadyShred

    LadyShred Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 24, 2009
    Alabama
    Hi ya'll. I have a little question. I own a still-air Hovar Bator incubator and I've hatched only one time in it (got it for Christmas). Out of 8 eggs, 3 pipped, 2 hatched, and I had to help those two that survived (didn't get to the 3rd one in time poor baby). They were standard sized silkies. Hatched Jan 24th.

    Now I have 29 eggs (Jap Bantams, OEG bantams - crele, barred, Silver Duckwing, Red Pyle, Brown Red, and B.B.Red, and 4 Standard OEG eggs - Golden Duckwing). I candled them yesterday and surprisingly they are all fertile. Problem is - the weather as far as temperature goes is INSANE down here in Alabama this year. After being 79 degress last week, it dove down to 28 degree high yesterday. And that's completely throwing off the temp in my incubator BIG TIME. It's driving me crazy. The eggs have been in the bator for about a week and a half now and I can't tell if there's any blood rings from the varying temp. Sometimes I can't get the temp to go over 95 degrees on cold days. And when it warms up outside, it will shoot up to 102 degrees. I try to keep the temp in my house at a constant, but I work full-time and sometimes no one is at home to watch the incubator, which is becoming a full-time job in itself.

    Any tips or ideas? Is this just bad timing as far as trying to hatch? My dad was looking forward to having some spawn from his Golden Duckwings, but I'm not sure if I could give him any at this point.

    OR should I get a better incubator? I've used this kind for years, but never before with the temp as variable as it is. Aargh!
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2009
  2. Poulets De Cajun

    Poulets De Cajun Overrun With Chickens

    Ambient room temperature affects the internal temperature of the incubator. Any styrofoam incubator, no matter the model will be affected like this. On cold days try to heat the room, or cover the incubator with a blanket. On warm days try to cool the room a bit, and ensure that the sun is not beaming down on it.

    The temp in a still air should be around 100 to 101...

    If your HB has a wafer thermostat, you may consider buying a new wafer as well. Wafers aren't good forever. Overtime the liquid inside dries out and its no more good. That could be affecting the temperature fluctuations as well.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 8, 2009
  3. LadyShred

    LadyShred Chillin' With My Peeps

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    119
    Jan 24, 2009
    Alabama
    I have the bator on a table in the corner, away from the window and away from the vent. I keep it well-ventilated so they can get the oxygen they need. I try to keep the temp right at 100 degrees. I know even the slightest difference in degree can be fatal for the embryo - that's why it's bothering me so much. I have an automatic egg turner so I don't have to open the top and let the humidity out. I try to leave them alone as much as possible and just let them grow.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2009
  4. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    I am having the same problem since the weather is constantly changing this week. Last night it was 38 degrees here, tomorrow the high is supposed to be 73 !

    I have resorted to heating the room (that my incubator, hatcher/incubator and 2 brooders are in) to a minimum of 68 degrees with a small room heater with a thermostat.

    I work, so covering with and removing blankets was not working for me. So far I am having 80% hatch rates, so I must be doing something right !

    Good Luck !!
     

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