Still trying to figure out a dust bath!

Discussion in 'Quail' started by Sammbalina, Dec 16, 2018.

  1. Sammbalina

    Sammbalina Chirping

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    I was wondering what you all thought of this for a dust bath? The only ingredient I have any consern about is the carbon, Is that safe for quail? I was also considering EcoEarth mixed with reptile sand?

    I am NOT going to use DE or play sand. I have a sensitive respiratory system so can’t do DE and play sand causes cancer!!!
     

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    Last edited: Dec 16, 2018
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  2. ChickNanny13

    ChickNanny13 Crossing the Road

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    I have chickens & their dust bath consists of the dirt/shavings in their enclosure. I do sprinkle DE as a :fl preventative for mites. When I first got started purchased sand, topsoil, peat moss and other stuff to make their "bath" ... Ended up tossing it on the ground cause they bathe where ever they want.

    @TwoCrows @Texas Kiki
     
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  3. Fishkeeper

    Fishkeeper Songster

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    That could work. The carbon is probably activated carbon, which helps to absorb smells.
    All chickens need for a dust bath is loose dirt, and that's loose dirt. You could also use sandy soil from outside if you have naturally sandy soil.
     
  4. Sammbalina

    Sammbalina Chirping

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    My quail are in a wire-floored hutch up off the ground, so they can’t dust bath wherever. Plus, I don’t have natural soil, I have clay and live at the bottom of a mountain in a fancy pants neighborhood, so the little bit of dirt we do have is probably contaminated with chemicals.

    I had also thought of using organic potting mix.
     
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  5. PirateGirl

    PirateGirl Chicken Lover, Duck Therapist

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    Since wood ash is safe to add into a dust bath, I would say the carbon is likely safe as well since there would be carbon in wood ash.
     
  6. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Bird is the word!

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    I don't see a problem with the reptile soil. The carbon will probably do them good, what little is in it.

    Organic potting soil is fine too. Avoid potting soils with perlite in it.
     
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  7. ChickNanny13

    ChickNanny13 Crossing the Road

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    When using potting soil, check to make sure there's no fertilizer in it.
     
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  8. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Bird is the word!

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    :goodpost:
     
  9. Anorakei

    Anorakei In the Brooder

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    I've seen my quail do baths in their substrate, which is just small wood chippings. Your thing should be fine.

    In their sandbox I use bird sand, which they appear to prefer over their substrate. A nice thing about sand is that you can run it through a sieve to clean out any droppings instead of having to throw all of it away. (Ofc you should still replace it every so often, sieving just allows you to get way more mileage out of your sand than you would otherwise.)

    I expect reptile sand would work too. A nice bonus with bird sand is that it often contains grit that the birds might swallow for extra calcium/better digestion.
     
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  10. Fishkeeper

    Fishkeeper Songster

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    Oh, yeah, reptile sand could work.
    However, reptile sand should NOT be used with reptiles! It has a lot of calcium in it, and if/when they ingest it while feeding, it can clog them up really badly. Most desert lizards that people keep on sand (leopard geckoes, bearded dragons) live on hard-packed soil in the wild, not soft sand.
     

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