Still Waiting for my Chicks

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by busymadre, Jan 30, 2013.

  1. busymadre

    busymadre Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 22, 2013
    Hickory, NC
    My chicks are yet to arrive. I have a few questions:

    I plan on getting them on a Friday afternoon so I can be home with them for a few days straight. I work 4 days a week and leave for work around 6:30 am and don't get home till 5:45pm. Besides leaving plenty of food and water, do I need to do anything else?
    When they are old enough to be outside, I plan on opening the coop door before leaving for work so they can go out to the enclosed pen whenever they want. (of course leaving plenty of food and water) If they don't lay eggs early, will their eggs be OK till I get home?
     
  2. sumi

    sumi Égalité Staff Member

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    They'll be fine without supervision for a few hours. Just make sure you give them plenty water, mine seems to like running out when I'm NOT around to top them up.
    The eggs, well it depends on the weather by you. I used to live in an extremely hot place and I often had to be away from home for an entire day and the eggs were o.k. left in the hot coop for hours. I've read of eggs freezing in the coop, but that depends on how cold it gets where you live. Frozen eggs can be thawed in the fridge and used, but if they're cracked it may be better to discard them for hygiene reasons.
     
  3. busymadre

    busymadre Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 22, 2013
    Hickory, NC
    Thanks! Here in North Carolina, the temps usually don't get too extreme either way. I will certainly keep an eye out for that though. Thanks for the advice.
     
  4. Jarrett Dobbins

    Jarrett Dobbins Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 25, 2013
    North Carolina
    Hello. I live in North Carolina too. Do you know how old the chicks are? If they are less than a month old, I would suggest keeping them in an enclosed area with small wire mesh to prevent them from escaping. You can turn them outside after a week or two after they have hatched as long as you keep a heat lamp or heater on for them all times. Once summer is here, you can remove the heat lamp during the day and only use it at night for about a month and then remove it completely. If it is the wintertime, which it is now, I would suggest keeping the heat lamp on at all times for about a month. Once they reach a month old, they are okay to live outside. When they reach two months or stop making baby chick noises, you can integrate them in with a larger, older flock. The eggs they lay will be perfectly fine unless the temperatures reach 28 or so degrees Fahrenheit, and, in that case, they may freeze. As long as you provide the proper nesting material for them, they will be fresh and ready for you to collect once you arrive home. I wish you luck!
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    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 16, 2013
  5. busymadre

    busymadre Chillin' With My Peeps

    139
    1
    81
    Jan 22, 2013
    Hickory, NC
    The chicks will be a day or two old. I already have a place set up for them while they are young. (dog crate with cardboard around to prevent draft and keep the bedding inside. also have a brooding light for their warmth. ) I plan on keeping them inside for maybe a month. The coop should be completed by then (almost done now) and the enclosed run area will be done as well. Not going to free-range them. We have some wild geese that come and go (there is a pond behind our property they love) and don't want any issues between them and my chickens. Will be interesting to see and/or hear what goes on once my chickens are outside on a regular basis.

    What part of North Carolina are you in?
     
  6. Jarrett Dobbins

    Jarrett Dobbins Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 25, 2013
    North Carolina
    Claremont, NC. It's around the Hickory area.
     

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