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Storing eggs in incubator before incubating?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by rosewellfarm, Mar 5, 2014.

  1. rosewellfarm

    rosewellfarm Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 4, 2013
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    Hi folks, we are collecting eggs for the next 10 days and here is what I was planning to do. Please let me know if you think this is a good/bad idea.

    Because I have read that it's better if the eggs are turned while storing them, and that it's also good to keep them in a sealed container or bag so they lose less moisture and don't get dust/dirt on them, I thought I would keep them in my incubator before I set them.

    We just got a Brinsea 40 Advance, so I'm planning to collect the eggs each day, and put them in the incubator with only the turner plugged in and the top put on (but not plugged in so there is not heat). This would turn the eggs so we don't have to worry about it while storing them and also keep them clean and hopefully help them keep moisture. I figured I would leave the little vent open so there would be some air flow. We plan to pull the eggs out and sterilize the incubator before actually starting the incubation. Can anybody tell me if there are downsides to this idea?

    So, so,sooooooo excited to start trying to hatch our own [​IMG]
    We are doing speckled sussex, easter eggers, and easter egger/marans crosses.
     
  2. fried green eggs

    fried green eggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Using a egg turner is a good idea - pointy end down. Holding eggs for 10 days will lower your hatch rate on the oldest eggs. Storing/holding eggs in a cool location 45-55 degs is better than 70 degs. Many people use a basement for storing eggs to hatch. Good Luck!
     
  3. Ariel188

    Ariel188 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    No basements in CA :)
     
  4. fried green eggs

    fried green eggs Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You don't want to refrigerate but maybe a large cooler with a ice pack? [​IMG]
     
  5. puppies9099

    puppies9099 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    we had 8 eggs that we put in our little black refrigerator they all died at 10 days in the incubator:(
     
  6. puppies9099

    puppies9099 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    :cd i would 'nt put the eggs in a refrigerator
     
  7. gatorshark75

    gatorshark75 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have always just put my hatching eggs in a basket or box wrapped with a clean towel. i also have never held them for more than five days before incubation. Out of all the hatches i have had the worst one was about 90% most of my hatches average 98% to 99% successfully hatch. I also usually keep them at room temp the hatch i had that was such a low percent was from eggs i kept at around 55 degrees. I figure if it isn't broke don't fix it so i went back to doing things my old way and have had good success ever since.
     
  8. rosewellfarm

    rosewellfarm Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 4, 2013
    Frankfort, KY
    Thanks for feedback, guys! We keep our house pretty cool - between 50F and 60F, so we're hoping that will be OK. Honestly, I've read so much from so many reputable sources with sometimes conflicting information, that I'm just going with what seems to be the overall consensus. We're assuming that we won't have a great hatch rate from the oldest eggs, but since there's a chance of success we're going to collect them for 10 days. We've numbered the eggs so we can keep track of what day they were collected, that way we'll know if they don't do well.

    I'm still debating on whether or not to wash the eggs, and if so, with what and how. Some folks say don't wash and don't try to incubate the dirty ones, others say throw them in without washing, and others say wash with water, detergent or a dry cloth. It seems like everybody has tried something different and each variation has worked for someone. I guess we've just got to go with a plan, and keep records of what we did so we can learn from it. Wheh, it can be overwhelming though!

    We are about halfway to a full bator today, so excited!!!
     
  9. gatorshark75

    gatorshark75 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use a damp cloth to wipe of the large debris off the eggs the ones that are really dirty i wash and put in the eating egg carton in the fridge. They make a commercial cleaner for hatching eggs but ive never used it and dont know anybody in my circle of breeder friends that does either.
     
  10. subhanalah

    subhanalah Overrun With Chickens

    I was reading something somewhere (can't remember where exactly) that warming the eggs slightly every day before setting the eggs, helped increase how long the eggs stayed "good" before setting them! Maybe that's why so many people see their geese laying on the eggs intermittently before the full broody behavior sets in? What does she know that we need to know? Maybe that's why sometimes ganders are found on the nest lol.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2014

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