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Strange symptoms no diagnosis. Urgent. Help.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by wolfchicken, Aug 30, 2015.

  1. wolfchicken

    wolfchicken Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 1, 2015
    Athens, Georgia
    I have a 2-3 year old leghorn. She stopped laying about 5 months ago and she has some strange discharge around her cloaca. It ranges from white to brown to yellow to green to clear, all at the same time. And it has a (no other way to describe it) rotted smell. :sick Her eating and drinking is regular. Her fecal mater is regular. I have not seen any sign of worms. None of my other birds has this. I have her separated. This has been going on for around a month. I have tried everything I know of, just short of taking her to a vet. Namely because I don't know of one around me. I am really concerned for her and the safety of my other birds. If anyone could help me it would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    Here's a list of avian vets in Georgia. I would call any near you to see if they have poultry experience or ask if they can recommend one. Lab work is the only way you'll know for sure.
    http://beautyofbirds.com/recommendedbirdvetsgeorgia.html

    It may be vent gleet.
    I have always recommended probiotics, especially if someone has given antibiotics that kill all the friendly bacteria.
    This is what I use.
    http://www.gro2max.com/ Formulated specifically for chickens.


    Here is a post from a friend in CA.

    "TREATMENT of VENT GLEET

    FIRST: ISOLATE infected bird to prevent spread of any secondary infections and also to avoid other birds pecking at the red/bloody vent.

    NEXT: Soak, Wash and Dietary Changes, Monistat....
    1. Soak her bum in warm water and Epsom salts. 10-15 minutes daily for at least 2 days. Clip those nasty butt feathers if necessary
    2. Natural Apple Cider Vinegar prevents yeast growth. For drinking water, Add 1.5 Tablespoons to 2 C. water. (My girl won't drink it so I put about 3/4 TBSP in and she will drink that)
    3. Epsom salts: Make sure you have a syringe (local pharmacy or feed store carries them, or ask your vet). Dilute 1 teaspoon of Epsom salt
    in 1 ounce of lukewarm water. Wrap the hen in a towel and sit down with her in your lap. Drape a generous fold in front of her to catch the
    drips and wipe her beak as needed. Hold the hen so that she is comfortable and her wings are kept at her side. Open the beak with one hand and squirt the liquid in her throat, a little bit at a time so that she can swallow. Don’t shoot it down her open gullet at full-force, or it could get into her lungs. Let her close her beak and swallow. Repeat. If some dribbles out, don’t worry. Wear clothes you don’t care about – she’s bound to shake her head and spray you.

    Epsom salt is a naturally occurring mineral, a combination of magnesium and sulfate. It’s soothing on the skin, and so is the choice for soaking baths if a hen has a dermatological issue. Epsom salt is also used internally. It detoxifies toxins, so if your hen has ingested a dangerous plant, or consumed botulism, or gotten into a poison, an Epsom salt drench is the cure. It acts as a laxative, so if your hen’s system needs flushing, or if her crop is impacted or the digestive process seems blocked, this will gently move things along. It also controls yeast infections. It’s a general cure-all, so if you’re faced with a hen that seems weak in the legs, has a sudden loss of vigor, seems sick without having respiratory symptoms, Epsom salt might help. It can’t hurt.

    4. Diet: Keep giving her the Apple Cider Vinegar water and in addition offer her plain natural yogurt. I mix with a little warm water and syringe into beak a few times a day
    5. I bought Monistat (I bought drugstore brand Miconizole). Get the one for 7 day treatment with 7 disposable applicators (not suppositories). Fill applicator. Gently ease into vent (eggs come out of there so the applicator isn't a problem). Inject about 1/3 of the cream in as far as you can. (I squirt out a little and wipe the tip with a paper towel, clean off the applicator with alcohol and wrap in plastic wrap until next treatment). Best to do this in the AM before giving food and wait a bit to feed so she doesn't poop out the meds. Repeat for 7 days. Keep her confined for and continue treatment for 7 days.
    DO NOT USE ANTIBIOTICS. THEY WILL KILL ALL THE GOOD BACTERIA YOU ARE TRYING TO INTRODUCE

    You should see improvement in about 3 days but continue to treat for a full week to make sure she is completely recovered. "
     
  3. wolfchicken

    wolfchicken Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 1, 2015
    Athens, Georgia
    Thank you I will try this. I can't afford a vet so I will try this instead:)
     
  4. ChickenCanoe

    ChickenCanoe Chicken Obsessed

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    Nov 23, 2010
    St. Louis, MO
    Your state poultry lab could possibly read a fecal sample for a small fee.

    I feel you on being able to afford a vet. I can't. I treated a rooster for bumble foot yesterday. I think it went well. Just an office visit to our poultry vet is $85 before the surgery. I'd eat the rooster first.

    University of Georgia Tifton Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
    43 Brighton Road
    Tifton, Georgia 31793-3000
    Phone: 229-386-3340 Fax 229-386-3399
     
  5. wolfchicken

    wolfchicken Out Of The Brooder

    28
    2
    26
    Jan 1, 2015
    Athens, Georgia
    Thank you. I hadn't even thought of the university. I may try this if it isn't to expensive. Thank you again.:)
     

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