Strange...

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by AGUANGA, Nov 20, 2015.

  1. AGUANGA

    AGUANGA New Egg

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    Well the chicks that hatched are all fine. I had posted before. Chicks have been with mama but now it seems she wants to leave (chicks are about 3 weeks old) as she flew out of the place I had her and into the coop with other hens. Her home is attached to the coop. The other hens attacked her! what suggestions do you have for me? I have not been able to build another coop yet..in 2 weeks I can. Hate to see her get beat up..she was raised with these hens and now they are attacking her. Thinking about putting the three of them in bathroom until son gets here to build another coop. Your thoughts please? thanks! Dee
     
  2. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    I keep broodies separated but still where the flock can see them, I usually get them back into the flock in the first week or two after the hatch, there's always some drama, so it's put them together then separate when things get too bad, repeat until everyone can get along, it can take a few days of doing this, and I only separate if it's escalating or I can't supervise them, they always get separated at night until I'm comfortable with the situation, your chicks are old enough to join the flock. So keep at it, it's all a normal part of re-establishing the pecking order.
     
  3. KarennFallon

    KarennFallon Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 19, 2015
    Was reading oldhenslikesdogs post. Do the new chicks, old enough to join the flock have a problem with the other hens, or vise versa? The mom was being attacked for having been gone from the flock, but what about the young chicks. I'm assuming the chicks were hatched naturally.
     
  4. KarennFallon

    KarennFallon Out Of The Brooder

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    After reading about a hen that it took 2 months to be reintroduced to a flock it was raised in, I am wondering about getting a few new young chicks next Spring.
     
  5. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    I keep everyone separately in a wire run so the chicks can get strong and big enough to run away from attacks, usually 2 weeks, sometimes 3, then I let the whole batch out, whether it is one chick or ten, with mommy, always with supervision, I become a chicken referee. As I stated it doesn't always work on day one, sometimes it can take a week or so until the bickering and attacks stop, first time out can be a whole 10 minutes, the key is to keep at it, eventually things do work out, I think sometimes the fighting is from jealousy. The chicks get integrated in the flock fairly easily.
     
  6. oldhenlikesdogs

    oldhenlikesdogs Lots of Chickens Premium Member

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    the best way to integrate new members is when they are young, between 6-10 weeks, it's normal for chicks to appear every year, I house them in a pen within the coop for a week or two, the same as I do with a broody, then they start mingling with supervision, it's quite easy, now integrating adults is problematic because adults or older pullets as seen as intruders to be driven away. Chicks to adult birds are natural and normal.
     
  7. KarennFallon

    KarennFallon Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 19, 2015
    Good to know, thank you!
     
  8. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

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    I let mum and chicks out with the rest of the flock after a couple of days of being hatched (they hatch in the main coop so i guess they are not a surprise to the rest of the flock) and the rest of the flock basically seem to ignore the chicks. Its only when they are around 6 weeks old that the flock begins to teach them some chicken manners. Last week i got 4 additional flock members that are layers and they don't seem to be over friendly towards my 7 week olds so when i hatch anymore, i may well have to revise what i have done in the past.

    CT
     
  9. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    If you have a broody hen, let her stay with the flock. Her broody hormones will cause her to rise to the top of the flock. I swear my layers tiptoe around her. When the chicks hatch, the rest of the flock are rather like, "what did you do" and if any get too close, whew! She will clean their clocks. Then the flock accepts them, and mostly ignores them. I have seen them eating right between the legs of another chicken.

    This works for me, but I will admit that I have lost some chicks, as in survival is of the fittest. They need to hatch, dry off and stick with mom. Those that do, do fine. Last fall in October, I had a hen hatch out 4 and raised them just fine, by herself in the flock. A week later it was -15F, and they did fine.

    What often happens is the people following advice here, pull the broody hen so she won't be bothered while she broods. The flock forgets her, she does not belong to the flock anymore. Then people want to wait until the chicks get big to add them all back to the flock. Running out of room about 3-4 weeks. At this time the broody hormones are beginning to fall. The hen is beginning to forget her chicks, and with the best intentions the people put the whole group into the flock.

    The hen is desperately trying to find her place in the pecking order, and the chicks (foreign to the flock) are free game and without protection. and it is a disaster.

    Always have some hide outs available!.

    Mrs K
     
  10. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    Not much help in your situation now, sorry, my advice is for next time.
     

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