stuck to membrane after internal pip? anyone experience this?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by klf73, Aug 27, 2008.

  1. klf73

    klf73 Mad Scientist

    Jun 1, 2008
    Maine
    I have been hatching ameraucana and araucana since yesterday. When I went to pull some chicks to the brooder I could hear a specific chick peeping, I was the last on that side of the bator. Well today it still hadn't pipped the shell. Since all the eggs it was set with had hatched and the peeping was almost non-existant when I candled, I decided to take a peek. What I found was that the chick pipped the air cell at a vein, and the blood dried the membrane to it's face. There wasn't a lot of blood in the veins so I wet the membrane to unstick it and help it out. The yolk is completely absorbed but the chicks head looks big(or swollen, can't really tell which). I don't know if it's having problems because something is wrong with it, or if it's because it "should" have hatched yesterday and is just beat. I will post a pic of it next to one of it's hatch mates if it lives. Anyone ever find out the chick got stuck to the membrane by bad placement of the pip? I'm sure if I left it alone it would have died just because it couldn't move it's head to even pip the shell [​IMG]

    Krista
     
  2. SundownWaterfowl

    SundownWaterfowl Overrun With Chickens

    Maybe it is from low humidity.
     
  3. Three Cedars Silkies

    Three Cedars Silkies Overrun With Chickens

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    I don't believe it's low humidity. Even with humidity at 65% something that is wet will dry and stick. I think you're right klf...It pipped the vein and the small amount of blood dried and stuck it to the membrane. There isn't much room in there.
     
  4. klf73

    klf73 Mad Scientist

    Jun 1, 2008
    Maine
    I don't think the humidity had anything to do with it either, the only place it was *stuck* was the face where it pipped. It was enough blood that the q-tips I used looked pretty bloody after I cleaned up the face, and it was all dry blood.
    Krista
     
  5. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    It is common for chicks to pip and never hatch. It happens.
     
  6. klf73

    klf73 Mad Scientist

    Jun 1, 2008
    Maine
    MP- this is what has been driving me INSANE lately [​IMG] . Ever since I had a pip that couldn't hatch cuz it was too big for it's shell(and died), I mean the air cell barely had room in it, I am so torn if I should help. I did have one I helped a week ago, it's shell was kind of rounded, chick is fine just had a slight spraddle leg and I think because of the shape of the egg it had a hard time hatching. Since then I helped 3 which I kind of regret, 1 pipped and never hatched so I helped it out, had neurological issues, 1 had an open skull(poor thing had a blank stare) and this one was peeping crazily for 2 days so I *helped* and it too seems to have a neurological issue. I have 1 egg in my bator and am afraid to see what happens. It's hatchmates hatched 2 days ago. There is movement, no air cell pip. I am just staring at it [​IMG] and waiting......... I feel horrible but I almost just want to wake up and have them both pass, just cuz this anxiety is KILLING me [​IMG]
    Krista
     
  7. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    In my experience when you help them hatch you are left a chick that would have been better off letting nature take its course. Yes, it is hard to stand by and watch them die in the shell. It is even harder to cull them or watch them hang on in a miserable life for a few days. We humans want to help too much. Yes, there are cases when helping turns out well. You have to choose to help or not to help. If you help you also have to choose to allow a chick with no quality of life to linger and suffer or do the right thing.

    For the record, in my opinion - chicks with severe twisted beaks and hatching with one eye and other poblems have no quailty of life. I won't hand raise disfigured birds or those with issues. I rarely help them hatch. Learned my lesson the hard way.
     
  8. Three Cedars Silkies

    Three Cedars Silkies Overrun With Chickens

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    MP...I almost never help one anymore. I just have to trust that if they can't get out of the shell, something must be wrong. It may not always be true, but I would say that 75% of the time it is.

    Oh, I've done my share of "helping" too....no beaks, twisted beaks, no eyes, etc. I pretty much don't do it anymore.
     
  9. monarc23

    monarc23 Coturnix Obsessed

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    Quote:I've helped a few chicks that were way too big for their shells and air cells I just didnt really say mucha bout it because i didnt want people thinking they should interfiere with theirs id id though because they couldnt literally get out..and wheni wash elping them out...they sTILL barely got out...my chick Hawn, a golden Jumbo the biggest jumbo ihave..."she" was stuck in her shell not by membrane she just litterally could not get out...she was pretty much trapped in there...its' pretty bad when even me with tweezers had a heck of a time getting her out (picking the shell apart, i had to break the whole way down to it's belly in the shell for her to have enough room toslide out). Fully absorbed too.

    This is Hawn, nothings wrong with "her" (hoping it's a hen can ya tell? LOL):

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2008

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