Study of feeding DE (diatomaceous earth) very positive!

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by CarolynF, Jul 25, 2011.

  1. CarolynF

    CarolynF Chillin' With My Peeps

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    At this year's meeting of the Poultry Science Association link a paper was presented entitled
    Effect of diatomaceous earth on parasite load, egg production, and egg quality of free-range organic laying hens link

    The abstract states...
    The effectiveness of diatomaceous earth (DE) as a treatment against parasites and to increase feed efficiency and egg production of organically raised free-range layer hens was evaluated in 2 breeds of commercial egg layers [Bovan Brown (BB) and Lowmann Brown (LB)] that differ in their resistance to internal parasitic infections. Half the hens of each breed were fed diets supplemented with DE (2%). Their internal parasite loads were assessed by biweekly fecal egg counts (FEC) and by postmortem examination of the gastrointestinal tract. Supplementing DE in diets of LB hens, the more parasite-resistant breed, did not significantly affect their FEC and adult parasite load. However, BB hens treated with dietary DE had significantly lower Capillaria FEC, slightly lower Eimeria FEC, fewer birds infected with Heterakis, and significantly lower Heterakis worm burden than control BB hens. Both BB and LB hens fed the diet containing DE were significantly heavier, laid more eggs, and consumed more feed than hens fed the control diet, but feed efficiency did not differ between the 2 dietary treatments. Additionally, BB hens consuming the DE diet laid larger eggs containing more albumen and yolk than hens consuming the control diet. In a subsequent experiment, the effectiveness of DE to treat a Northern fowl mite (Ornithonyssus sylviarum) infestation was tested. Relative to controls, both breeds of hens that were dusted with DE had reduced number of mites. The results of this study indicate the DE has the potential to be an effective treatment to help control parasites and improve production of organically raised, free-range layer hens.

    We now have documentation that feeding 2% DE treats internal parasites, external parasites (mites), improves health, increases production, produces larger eggs containing more albumen and yolk.

    I hope this helps those with questions. As a side note, the 2% is by weight, e.g., for 100 pounds of feed add 2 pounds of DE.​
     
  2. Tres Amigas

    Tres Amigas Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the info, Carolyn! I use DE in my coop, but have never dusted my girls...going to have to do that. Have been interested in this debate for awhile now - glad to have this info. [​IMG]
     
  3. ninabeast

    ninabeast Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for posting...very interesting!
     
  4. SmokinChick

    SmokinChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    2 pounds of DE is...what 2-3 cups? I find it hard to imagine that amount of grit, dirt, dust whatever you want to classifiy it as, can do anything internally for an animal.
    Any research is good and kudos to the publisher.
    I'm getting my popcorn to follow this.
    Please post a link to the paper. I could not find it at the link you had, thanks.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2011
  5. Chris09

    Chris09 Circle (M) Ranch

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    Well that like what 1 study that says DE works on internal parasites and how many other tests proved that DE does not work on internal parasites, a lot more than one?

    As a side note, the 2% is by weight, e.g., for 100 pounds of feed add 2 pounds of DE.

    I would think that it would be 2lbs of DE to 98lbs of feed.

    Chris​
     
  6. mystang89

    mystang89 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the post. I've been debating for a while whether or not to get any DE. I think once I have some money I will invest in some.
     
  7. pjknust

    pjknust Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I use DE for my hens and for my poodles. I dont have worms, never have. I use it everywhere. In food they eat, around the ground where the food is in the bowls. Around the cat food bowl outside, keeps the ants out of the cat food. I use it around the house foundation, I use in the chick pen to keep it dry and keep the ants out.
    I have even taken it myself. I dont care what the 'other' studies say, I KNOW it works.

    pam in TX
     
  8. Bear Foot Farm

    Bear Foot Farm Overrun With Chickens

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    We now have documentation that feeding 2% DE treats internal parasites, external parasites (mites), improves health, increases production, produces larger eggs containing more albumen and yolk.

    That's not much of a study when they don't give many details, and you are reading the results incorrectly

    Those parasites listed aren't common worms, and there is NO evidence presented to show FEEDING DE has anything to do with mites.

    Relative to controls, both breeds of hens that were dusted with DE had reduced number of mites.

    What it really says is for half the birds it did nothing at all
    Supplementing DE in diets of LB hens, the more parasite-resistant breed, did not significantly affect their FEC and adult parasite load

    They try to imply the DE had something to do with larger eggs, but notice those birds ate MORE FEED

    Both BB and LB hens fed the diet containing DE were significantly heavier, laid more eggs, and consumed more feed

    An unbiased study would have fed both groups the same amount

    Pay attention to the details, and you'll see there was a slight improvement in ONE BREED of birds.

    This is hardly "proof" that feeding DE will help other birds in light of many other studies that do not verify these results, one of which you yourself posted in another thread, and it's by the SAME authors:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=544490&p=4

    Here's an earlier one from 2009

    Effect of diatomaceous earth on internal parasites of freerange, organic laying hens.
    D. C. Bennett*, Y.-J. Rhee, A. Yee, and K.M. Cheng, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    The abstract is presented on page 81 of the 98th Annual Meeting of the Poultry Science Association, July 2009.
    link here: http://www.poultryscience.org/psa09/abstracts.pdf

    In it they state, "DE had no effect
    on the number of hens infected, FEC, or worm burdens
    . However, body
    mass and egg production were greater in hens consuming the DE diets.
    These hens also laid larger eggs with thicker shells. The results of this
    study suggest that there is no evidence that DE is an effective treatment
    to control gastrointestinal parasitic infections
    of free-range laying hens.
    However, DE as a feed ingredient may maintain body mass, increase
    egg production and improve egg quality in free range laying hens fed
    an organic diet."​
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2011
  9. Speceider

    Speceider Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would like to see the whole paper. Abstracts do not allow an evaluation of the data.

    Clint
     
  10. Medicine Man

    Medicine Man Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:An unbiased study would have fed both groups the same amount

    You seem to be confusing the quantity fed with the quantity actually consumed. It's not that one group of birds was fed more or less, it's that the group ate more of what it was fed. It's common for such a factor to be noted in studies of this type, whether the subject of the study is DE, peas, beet pulp, digestive enzymes, beet pulp, etc.
     

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