Study of Indian Blue peafowl. Growth of male peafowl train feathers.

Discussion in 'Peafowl' started by clinton9, Jul 9, 2011.

  1. clinton9

    clinton9 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I studied the few longest train feathers, and I found they grow at 7 mm per day.

    A 1535 mm train feather take 225 days to regrow, growing at 7 mm per day.

    Adult male peafowl take 240 days to regrow the longest train feathers.

    During moult of train, flight, tail feathers, the peafowls"s need for insects increase as more insects they eat, the faster the growth of train feathers, with daily grow rates normally 7mm per day, but can speed to 8 mm per day on birds roaming outside in large land only, where they exerises alot as they find lots of diffenent kinds of insects.
    They may eat the baby snakes and mice if they find them. Their testies become smaller, with birds have no interest in sex with peahens.

    Cat foods / dog foods may be of help to male peafowls, along with insects you find in houses.

    When adult male peafowls shedding train feathers, the shorter inner train feathers next door to tail coverts, are first to shed, followed by longer train feathers, so the last feathers to shed, are longest train feathers with "fish tail" Shedding of entirely train feathers may take @ 5-8 days.

    Clinton.
     
  2. Kedreeva

    Kedreeva Longfeather Lane

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    A nice study! I'm going to have to come back for information when I pick up the peafowl school posts again.
     
  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    How about supplementing insect forage with small fish or ground fish? My chickens pound down bluegill fry.
     
  4. Frosty

    Frosty Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So this makes me wonder what is going on with my guy... perhaps he was catching feathers on the fence? He lost all of his LONG feathers, but still has the shorter feathers in front of them. And he started losing the longer feathers a few weeks ago, there is one left. I found the longer feathers all over the place, not stuck in the fencing so I assumed he was molting his train. This is his first year with a train, so I have nothing to compare it to.
     
  5. Kedreeva

    Kedreeva Longfeather Lane

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    They pretty much drop them all at once, Frosty, and now is about the right time for it. Sounds pretty normal.
     
  6. zazouse

    zazouse Overrun With Chickens

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    Frosty mine is pretty much doing the same thing he has droped just about all his fringe feathers but still has all his eye feathers.

    When the shafts of feathers turn brite white thats when they start loosing them.
     
  7. clinton9

    clinton9 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi centrarchid,
    Fish are not eaten by peafowls, and peafowls eats insects, baby snakes, worm, rarely mice.

    I suggest you cook fish cakes & mix with breads & bake the fish cakes, then leave them to cool before feed your peafowls.

    Cheers

    Clinton.


    Quote:
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2011
  8. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Quote:
    Clinton9,

    Most of what we actually feed our confined birds does not resemble in type or form what they would consume under natural conditions. My chickens (many are games or red jungle fowl) eat a diet very similar to natural diet of wild peacock although they (excepting red jungle fowl) do have a bred in capacity to consume more grains. Instead of discounting fish option out of hand, give it a try. My birds do not naturally consume fish either but they most certainly will consume fish under and inch long if opportunity presents itself. For me, small fish, especially bluegill are easy to come by in relatively large amounts. If you are into bow-fishing, the fish cake option based on one of the several exotic carps or native buffalos would be worth trying as you indicate.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2011
  9. clinton9

    clinton9 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi centrarchid,
    Fish you plan to feed your peafowls, have to be sea-living fish and the amount of fish have to be limited, to moulting season, when peafowls need more protion, for building the train feathers, but fresh-living fish will be ok in small amount, but fresh-water fish tends to be less tasty than sea-living fish.

    There are two ideas below.

    1) A big fish:

    It must be de-scaled & gutted.

    You are not to feed the peafowls on raw big fish, Peafowls will not eat a raw dead big fish.

    You have to cook the fish, then leave the fish to cool in air.

    When fish are cool to touch, remove the meat off fish bones and mix them with food & feed the peafowls & junglefowls.

    Train your peafowls by mix the fish with foods & insects, they will learn to eat cooked fish meat once they find cooked fish meat tasty.

    A 300m.m. fish will feed 10 peafowls.



    2) Small fish:

    Catch the fish not bigger then 100m.m.

    Don't gut the fish.

    Then put the raw small fish on feeding bowl and talk to peafowls about fish good to eat.

    They may eat or not eat the small fish.

    If they don't eat the fish, - mix the fish with food.

    1 small fish per one peafowl.

    Be patient as that take time for peafowls to learn to eat the fish.

    Cheers

    Clinton.














    Quote:
    Clinton9,

    Most of what we actually feed our confined birds does not resemble in type or form what they would consume under natural conditions. My chickens (many are games or red jungle fowl) eat a diet very similar to natural diet of wild peacock although they (excepting red jungle fowl) do have a bred in capacity to consume more grains. Instead of discounting fish option out of hand, give it a try. My birds do not naturally consume fish either but they most certainly will consume fish under and inch long if opportunity presents itself. For me, small fish, especially bluegill are easy to come by in relatively large amounts. If you are into bow-fishing, the fish cake option based on one of the several exotic carps or native buffalos would be worth trying as you indicate.
     
  10. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Clinton9,

    Fish (below) I suggest are 10 to 15 mm, small enough to be ingested intact and alive by even a hatchling peafowl.

    [​IMG]

    Several thousand can fit into your hand.


    Where are from, your metric system syntax appears foreign?
     

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