Subcutaneous Fluids - Warning Contains Pictures of a Deceased Plucked Chicken

casportpony

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When I give fluids I give them on the between the wings on the back. Some do it closer to the neck, but I worry about puncturing the air sacs.

Air Sacs
ill_bird_airsacs.gif
ill_bird_airsacs2.gif


From: http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=15+1829&aid=2721


https://www.backyardchickens.com/content/type/61/id/6518160/
https://www.backyardchickens.com/content/type/61/id/6518184/



Items Needed


This is what I use when I give fluids by myself:
This is a bag warmed Lactated Ringer's, but one can also use 0.9% Sodium Chloride


Enough syringes to give whatever amout you choose to give


Pre-filled syringes with warmed fluids and new 18 gauge needle.



Giving the Fluids

Plucked to give a better visual.




Insert needle and watch that it doesn't poke back out. Slowly depress plunger and look for leaks. If no leaks, give fluids.






This is after 75 ml.






Here you can see how it's spread under the skin.


Wet area with rubbing alcohol, this will allow better viewing of the injection site. Insert needle, then slowly add fluids.






Another place to give subcutaneous injections is in the inguinal flap

This photo by BYC's @Nambroth





-Kathy
 
Last edited:

casportpony

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In another thread someone asked:
Quote:
Which was in response to my post about giving 200 ml of fluids under the skin to a sick peahen who weighs 3.7 kg (8.14 pounds). That 200 ml is only 5.4% of her weight, which happens to be the amount most mature non laying hens drink in a day, so while it might seem like a lot, it was really just her daily maintenance dose, which made me remember the time my vet had me give fluids to an egg bound peahen... for that she suggested 200 ml under the skin *twice* a day, and I'm gonna guess that's because the fluid requirements of laying hens are more than twice that of non-laying hens.



Any of you watch Dr K? If so, did you see the last episode where they gave a 15 gram Sugar Glider 2 ml of fluids? Anyway, just something to think about the next time you read about someone trying to keep their bird or mammal hydrated using an eye dropper.

-Kathy
 

circesfire

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I have never given fluids to a chicken - thankfully mine have never needed it yet. However, I worry about it in the summer as it is so hot here. When I used to work with raptors we would give sub cutaneous fluids on the sides under the wings. Do you think it would be ok to give them in the same place to a chicken?\
 

casportpony

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I have never given fluids to a chicken - thankfully mine have never needed it yet. However, I worry about it in the summer as it is so hot here. When I used to work with raptors we would give sub cutaneous fluids on the sides under the wings. Do you think it would be ok to give them in the same place to a chicken?\
I don't see why not... I have to do them by myself, so that's the main reason I give the larger birds fluids on the back. Smaller ones are easier for me if I give them in that fold of skin where the leg meets the body.

-Kathy
 

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