Sudden deaths in flock

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by saltidog, Nov 25, 2014.

  1. saltidog

    saltidog Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 10, 2014
    Hello All,
    I am writing this tonight with sadness. Over the last 3 to 4 weeks, we have lost 2 bantam roosters and one hen, all less than 2 years of age. Their death was sudden with no symptoms in 2 of them. The only thing I noticed with the death of one rooster was that he appeared to be asleep during the day while outside, feathers puffed up and possibly some extra drinking. This evening, we lost our first hen, approximately 6 months old, a beautiful wynadotte we adopted about 2 months ago. I love these chickens and feel so bad. I need to figure out what the problem is and correct it before we lose anymore. PLEASE HELP ME TO FIGURE THIS OUT! Thanks so very much for your help. I have begun them on Bragg's in the water and give them D.E. I have never 'wormed' them.
     
  2. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Northern California
    Young birds are more susceptible to intestinal worms and coccidiosis, but older birds can suffer from them too. Leave the ACV in the cupboard and the DE in the potting shed. Birds will drink more when suffering from enteritis. When cocci protozoa multiply in the intestinal tract for a length of time, it can damage the intestinal tract. I've found medicated feed not to be an effective preventative compared to dosing the water with Amprolium for 5 days, every third week of the month until they are at least 9 months old. Do it with one batch of chicks and not the other, and you'll see the difference in growth versus undersized, sickly, or dead birds. You follow up each treatment with poultry vitamin-electrolyte & probiotic dispersible powder in waterers for 3 days. It is beneficial to do that 2 days a week during the growth stages, and even as adults.
    Here are the dosage indications for both forms of Corid (Amprolium):
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    Coccidiosis is common, but bacterial enteritis, Fowl Cholera (doesn't always cause facial swelling), and of course, intestinal worms are also common depending on location. Intestinal worms will cause birds to eat more, then they begin to eat less over time, drink more, and become anemic. Capillary worms are not visible to the eye, and can damage the crop, obstruct the trachea, and esophagus. Benzamidazole anthelmintics will remove them. DE will not.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2014
  3. saltidog

    saltidog Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 10, 2014
    Thank you Michael Apple. Hmm, our only rooster isn't crowing so this could be why... I went on Tractor Supply as we have stores in area. Do you happen to know if they carry Corid for chickens? Is this the same powder as the Corid 20% for bovine? I want to purchase some right away tomorrow. We are in the midst of our first snow storm here on the East Coast to complicate matters. I will hope and assume that a farm supply place carries this???
     
  4. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Yes, Corid 20% powder is what you want to get. The hen that passed away would be valuable for a necropsy to find out what could be the problem. Here is a list of local labs that can perform necropsies by state: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/animal_dis_spec/poultry/downloads/labs_app.pdf Keep the bird refrigerated but do not freeze.

    I'm sorry about your birds, and know how troubling it can be. I hope you can get to the bottom of it and prevent any more losses.
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2014
  5. saltidog

    saltidog Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 10, 2014
    how will sulfadimethoxine work? I got that at our local tractor supply. they did not have Corid. What do you think? I am still checking other stores.
     
  6. saltidog

    saltidog Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 10, 2014
    I have located Corid at another store. I am venturing out again in the horrid snowstorm. I think I am holding off on the sulfa and going to get the Corid to try first. I am hoping this is wise decision. I read a few other threads on these drugs. Thoughts?
     
  7. Michael Apple

    Michael Apple Overrun With Chickens

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    Mar 6, 2008
    Northern California
    Sulfadimethoxine is effective against strains of intestinal coccidiosis. Corid is too, but also with cecal strains of coccidiosis. Here's a link to confirm it along with additional information regarding Coccidiosis: http://www.thepoultrysite.com/articles/1138/coccidiosis-control
     

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