Sudden temperature changes

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by capnmoby, Nov 10, 2016.

  1. capnmoby

    capnmoby Out Of The Brooder

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    Alright, my little flock of 6 is headed into their first winter. They are big and healthy. This fall has been warmer than normal, mid to upper 60s in the daytime. It looks like next week we may have a sudden drop in temps overnight, with a high forecast for 42. I am pretty sure that I am prepared for the winter, but is there anything I should do to prepare for such a sudden change? Thanks all!
     
  2. cavemanrich

    cavemanrich Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Make sure your coop is well ventilated and not drafty. Provide your chickens some cracked corn. It is a good source of heat producing calories.
    WISHING YOU BEST and since you are kind of new here. . [​IMG]
     
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  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    They can generally handle the drops well when in good weight. Rapid warming is harder on them in spring, Keep them hydrated so they eat well.
     
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  4. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Digestion of any feed will produce body warming calories....
    ...make sure any cracked corn given is balanced out with a good chicken ration of adequate protein percentage.
     
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  5. JackE

    JackE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Those temp drops (60s to 40s) are nothing to a chicken. My birds have been through bigger drops than that, and they don't even seem to notice, or care. Just keep the coop well ventilated, don't shut it up, and they will be fine.
     
  6. Cacique500

    Cacique500 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Good advice already given but I'll throw in my $0.02. Very important to make sure there's no cold wind blowing on them (drafts), but enough ventilation in the coop to get rid of the moisture and ammonia (poop).

    I'm in GA so we don't get super cold, but we can dip down into the teens on occasion. If I know it's going to be really cold, I'll sometimes give mine some canned corn before bed. Heed aart's advice though...I use it sparingly and try not to upset their normal intake of feed (treats recommended at 10% or less...corn is a "treat").

    The ladies will make it through the cold temps very well...it's the heat down here we have to deal with that's deadly...and we just got done with the most brutally hot, dry summer that I can remember.
     
  7. chickens really

    chickens really Overrun With Chickens

    I am in Central Alberta,Canada......I know COLD........

    I only give a bit of scratch if temps get down to -25 Celsius......



    Cheers!
     
  8. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    What is being done to keep birds watered?
     
  9. Mrs. K

    Mrs. K Overrun With Chickens

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    I think the most common newbie mistake is to think warm. What needs to be the emphasis is DRY. Dry chickens can easily handle that temperature swing. The way you keep them dry is good dry bedding, ventilation well above their heads, and roosting away from the walls or ceiling. Their heads should be at least a foot below the ceiling. Moist air goes out of the coop, with adequate ventilation. My south side, is open across the top by 4 inches. Makes a huge difference.

    Dry chickens are warm chickens, if fed and watered.

    Mrs K
     
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  10. JackE

    JackE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have found that ventilation, right at chicken level works really well. They like it.

    [​IMG]
     

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