Suggestions for Educative Presentation?

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by ShelterGirl, Jul 6, 2011.

  1. ShelterGirl

    ShelterGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 3, 2011
    I am already scheduled to bring one of our rescues, Pickles, to two different volunteer orientations at the humane society I work at. I am also soon going to try and schedule another presentation for him to appear at my brother's summer daycare program.

    Two of them will be for children, and one of the volunteer orientations will be for a 16 and up audience.

    Any suggestions what to include in either presentation?

    I am looking for some basic care tips for the kids, and some more advanced facts for the adults.

    I also am going to talk about some of our rescues. Thanks for the help!
     
  2. they'reHISchickens

    they'reHISchickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Reading
    Start with feed: both commercial and scratch. Have small containers to hand around for audience to see and smell.
    Describe living conditions and definitions of caged,cage-free, and free range.
    Please present a even view of the different living conditions. Even in caged birds, farmers can't make a living if the birds are not healthy and productive. In some cities of the world, people live 10-20 to a room. They may not like it but it is what they are used to and what the economy dictates at that place. The thing is to be healthy in that condition. We'd all love to live and free range in the wide open country but for some it is not possible!
    Bring as large a variety of eggs as you can locate: everyone thinks eggs are white.
    Bring full color pictures of both roos and hens of varying breeds to show variety. Show layer breeds, dual purpose and meat breeds.
    if you had a hen and chicks, it would guarantee a hit:)
     
  3. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Holts Summit, Missouri
    I stress they are short-tailed toothless dinosaurs that live in complex social groups. Describe life cycle. Their language is complex providing information about food resources and predators. Parental care is normally longer than that of most birds. They are omnivores to the extreme. Hatchlings are precosial (spelling?). Interesting parts, feet, wings (show feathers), comb and wattles, crop, and gizzard. Show them the poop with uric acid component that enables greater water conservation.

    I have trained some of my birds to come me when name is called. Some will fly six feet up to hand and will do so for children. Encourage kids / adults to allow birds to stand on their hands or arms.

    See link: https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=407880

    Much
    room for improvement on my efforts.
     
  4. ShelterGirl

    ShelterGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 3, 2011
    I am going to be bringing a rescue that we got from the shelter in June as a 2 week old chick. I'm going to do a bit more research to see what I can find as far as what you've suggested. I get 20 minutes per volunteer group [​IMG]
     
  5. centrarchid

    centrarchid Chicken Obsessed

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    Holts Summit, Missouri
    Quote:A two week old chick can easily be trained to fly up a foot or two for meal worm treat. More than one and it takes just a day or two with a few 15-minute training sessions to get name recognition up and running.
     
  6. ShelterGirl

    ShelterGirl Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 3, 2011
    That's very interesting! Pickles has learned to come when you say "Here chick, chicky!" and will fly over to you. He also is very well-minded and will not hop from your arm until you put your hand on the ground.
     

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