Sumatra Hen with Bubbles coming out of her beak

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by easttxchick, Oct 28, 2010.

  1. easttxchick

    easttxchick Lone Star Call Ducks

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    I have an approximately 1 year old Black Sumatra hen that had bubbles coming out of her beak this morning(the holes in the beak) when I let her out of the coop. Her eyes look fine and there is no sneezing.
    She is eating, looks VERY healthy, was scratching around outside...everything else appears normal and none of the other birds have any symptoms at all.
    I feed them a very healthy diet, they are kept inside a coop every night with pine shavings/hay on the floor.
    I am in full on panic mode, but don't want to jump the gun and start antibiotics if it could be something as simple as she drank too much water and it backed up in her beak. I also, however don't want to wait in case it is something contagious.
    I have her isolated right now, just in case.
    Any thoughts would be appreciated!
     
  2. Resolution

    Resolution Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Place this hen in a dog crate filled with dry leaves. While she's in your hands, stuff a whole garlic clove ( cut into slices if too large) down into her gullet. Always keep cranassure gel caps (for people with chronic urinary tract infections) on hand. Whenever a bird looks a bit off -giver a soft gel cap-
    You will also want to make walnuts and or almonds available for her to eat. Cease feeding mashes, crumbles or pellets.


    This upper respiratory infection is caused my mycoplasma contamination. Its time to recalibrate your husbandry protocols.
     
  3. easttxchick

    easttxchick Lone Star Call Ducks

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    Quote:Place this hen in a dog crate filled with dry leaves. While she's in your hands, stuff a whole garlic clove ( cut into slices if too large) down into her gullet. Always keep cranassure gel caps (for people with chronic urinary tract infections) on hand. Whenever a bird looks a bit off -giver a soft gel cap-
    You will also want to make walnuts and or almonds available for her to eat. Cease feeding mashes, crumbles or pellets.


    This upper respiratory infection is caused my mycoplasma contamination. Its time to recalibrate your husbandry protocols.

    Really? While I appreciate your input, please don't assume you know anything about my husbandry protocols.
     
  4. Resolution

    Resolution Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oh- I can see why that might have rubbed you the wrong way. I didn't mean to imply anything negative. By recalibrate- I mean- we unintentionally create disease vectors -generally with feed particulates- the disintegrated particles that make up pellets, crumbles and mashes. The material becomes more or less airborne -its scratched up with dust- mixes with similarly kicked up fecal material- its been tracked around on feet and preened onto the feathers- but let's start at the beginning.
    We get little chicks and feed them chick starter. Dollars to donuts its the chick mash that was first inhaled into the air sacs.. These particulates get lodged into the bird's respiratory system where they may just end up becoming dissolved or at least not harmful. Once the birds become adult sometimes the particulate inhalation becomes problematic.

    In the autumn, when birds spend just a few more hours together indoors - tucking their beaks to sleep- putting out more heat than during the spring and summer months-
    it tends to enable the birds -the capacity to ingest material -made up of the aforementioned properties- and this ends up in the bird's body. This is largely due to the actions of preening. Preening leads to further inhalation of dust particulate matter ( "poultry smut").

    This happens to everyone. Some breeds are more vulnerable than others.
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2010
  5. easttxchick

    easttxchick Lone Star Call Ducks

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    I'm sorry very, very touchy about my animals! I REALLY do appreciate the advice.
    It's still really warm here(I live in SE Texas) so they really don't spend much time indoors at all, well other than the fact that it gets dark a bit earlier.
    Sadly, I know nothing of this birds history as I just got her a few weeks ago. When I discovered this beak thing, she was with only the birds I got her with, and they seem fine.
    She is in a hospital cage right now and I have a call into my friend that works for the State Veterinary Lab-I flip out when anything goes wrong with any animal on this place.
    Sorry I was so short, but I get ridiculously attached to any animal that comes around.
    Another factor that I have working against me here is a large roaming band of guineas that don't belong to me-I have asked the owners to keep them home, but guineas are hard to keep contained. I have noticed their numbers are dwindling so I hope it's not something that has been brought over here by that marauding band...
     
  6. Resolution

    Resolution Chillin' With My Peeps

    No worries! I hope that it's some relief that Guineafowl are not disease vectors. The issue is largely environmental. Perhaps whomever had the bird beforehand did not keep it in the most sanitary conditions. I'd just get the bird hopped up on cranberry gel caps and garlic clove.
     
  7. Carrie Lynn

    Carrie Lynn Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Resolution, can dried cranberries be substituted for the gel caps as a preventative?
    Carrie Lynn
     
  8. secuono

    secuono Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 29, 2010
    Virginia
    So would this be the same if the bird also sneezed?
     
  9. Resolution

    Resolution Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:They certainly can be. Foragecakes contain them as do Babycakes- but really- its the cranberry seed oil that is most valuable here.
    The products I've listed here utilise cranberry biproducts that are higher in seeded pulp than the washed dry cranberries deemed fit for human consumption.

    The cranassure is made of cold-pressed cranberry seed oil. Its also chock full of vitamin C- something great for human and bird when plagued with an internal infection.

    Getting back to dried cranberries- yes- they can be used and are a fantastic preventative. Dark red fruits in general- pomegranates, black cherries- this time of year pomegranates are readily available- they work miracles.

    Another fruit every serious poultier needs to know about is the paw paw . This is a fruit that can be frozen for future use. It is a miracle cure all in my book.

    Persimmons are also useful as are Pumpkins- these fruits im talking about -they provide all sort of nutrients that your birds should be gorging on during the autumn and early winter.

    Frequent supplement days through the winter of these antioxidant, vitamin rich fruits- and of course animal fat- these will help to keep your flocks healthy all winter and prevent against infection.

    Babycakes are a fantastic supplement for adult birds for all these reasons but if you have a bird that is already getting ill you've got to stuff it with raw garlic, raw ginger, cranassure- and keep it away from pellets, mashes and crumbles- indeed once you've got a mycoplasma infection you've got to turpentine the hell out of the enclosures- change perches- fill up the coop with dried leaves- store contractor bags of dry leaves for use all winter- this is the ideal bedding-
    Feeding tables need to be constructed- you've got to get your hens away from their droppings and their droppings from their feed-

    replace dusty particulate feed materials with extruded kibbles and whole seeds and grains- and also supplement with these fruits as just roughly outlined.

    It will be critical that each hen house is outfitted with poop hammocks- and that feeding table be built where all feed stuffs are kept well off the floor.
     
  10. Resolution

    Resolution Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:[​IMG]

    yes
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2010

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