Summer Plant Swap/Trade

Discussion in 'Gardening' started by showmesilkies, Jun 24, 2017.

  1. showmesilkies

    showmesilkies Songster

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    Let's do something fun and beneficial for each other. Let's do a plant swap/trade.
    Rule 1. Be honest and fulfill the agreement with the other person
    Rule 2. Expect a fair trade.
    I'll start!
    I'm up for swapping/trading for just about anything that is not ordinary. I love cannas, Daylilies, Lilies, Hoyas, Tropical, Herbs, and could go on and on..
    I have to trade a variety of daylilies, cannas, lemon grass, hoya, spiderwort plant aka "wandering Jew", "Moses plant", variegated spider plant, "Queen of the Night" cactus, Mother-in-law’s Tongue/Snake plant, African Violets, Christmas Cactus,
    butterfly bush (white), Old fashion lavender lilac, old fashion white lilac, Rose of Sharon in various colors, Privet bush, Bridal Wreath Spirea, Iris, Bluebells (Virginia Cowslip), Artemisia 'Oriental Limelight', Hostas, Monkey grass (green, and variegated), Variegated Robbon Grass, Maiden & fountain grasses, Ajuga reptans 'Pink Elf', Vinca Vine 'Variegata', Lesser Periwinkle, Vinca minor "Atropurpurea", Asiatic Lily seeds, Rose hips, forsythia, Mock Orange, Jasmine, Honey Suckle, English Ivy, Angel Trumpet, Snowball bush, Mums, Trumpet Vine, yucca, Lemon Grass, Turmeric, Mint, ,
    Tulip Tree saplings, Pink Mimosa, Red bud saplings, Mulberry, Silver Maple, Willow, Ash, Black Walnut, Cottonwood, Sargent Crabapples. On occasion I have pineapple, lemon, apple, grapefruit and tangerine, avocado, and orange trees.
    Might be missing a few. If I remember anymore I'll update my list.

    Tips for Mailing Plants:

    -Do not mail plants to California or Hawaii because of strictly enforced state laws prohibiting importation of plant materials into these states. Most countries restrict or prohibit importation of plants from other countries as well. Check postal regulations for further information before mailing.
    -Mail plants bare root if possible to minimize spread of soil born diseases. -Make sure plants being mailed are healthy, free of insect or disease problems.
    -Package plants firmly to avoid damage from crushing in route. Choosing the right sized and shaped box is important.
    -Use lightweight packing materials, e.g. newspaper,. noodles, bubble wrap, plastic grocery bags, to lighten shipping weight.but secure contents.
    -Mail plants by the fastest economical means available such as USPS priority mail (2-3 day delivery), or UPS ground if delivery can be guaranteed in 3 days or less. The point of shipping and destination will affect delivery times. The quicker the trip, the better condition upon arrival.

    How to pack plants depends on their type: See tips below.

    -Cacti and Succulents: bare root, wrapped in newspaper

    -Herbaceous rooted plants non-dormant perennials and ferns: wrap roots with minimal amount of dampened sterile soil or sphagnum moss with clear wrap and tie around stem with twisty. Insert entire plant into plastic zip lock bag with dampened paper towel to maintain moisture around foliage

    -Woody rooted plants: Same method as herbaceous but not necessary to place in moistened plastic bag. After securing roots and sterile soil in clear wrap, wrap the entire plant in newspaper.

    -Bromeliads and Orchids: bare root enclosed in moistened zip lock bag.

    -Bulbs: bare root wrapped in newspaper

    -Dormant perennials: wrap roots in minimal amount of sterile soil or sphagnum moss and place in zip lock plastic bag.

    -Cuttings: Soak cuttings in water until turgid, then wrap cuttings in dampened paper towels and place in zip lock bag.

    -Aquatic and bog plants: Wrap in damp to wet paper towel, insert in zip lock bag.

    -Seed: Place seed in dry zip lock bag. If seed is crushable, place bubble wrap around it.
     
    Junochick likes this.
  2. KikisGirls

    KikisGirls Enlightened Premium Member Project Manager

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    Very good idea.
    I have actually mailed some seeds to other BYC members.
     
    showmesilkies likes this.
  3. showmesilkies

    showmesilkies Songster

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    Central Missouri
    My Coop
    I love plant trading/swapping. It's a win win for both parties!
     
    Junochick likes this.
  4. copper2

    copper2 Songster

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    I have green eyed cowpea seeds. You have a ton of trees Showmesilkies
     
  5. showmesilkies

    showmesilkies Songster

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    Dec 29, 2008
    Central Missouri
    My Coop
    what types of trees?
     
  6. copper2

    copper2 Songster

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    Do you have crab apples available?
     
  7. showmesilkies

    showmesilkies Songster

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    Dec 29, 2008
    Central Missouri
    My Coop
    the crabapples are all suckers so it's doubtful I could get a nice straight and rooted sapling
     
  8. copper2

    copper2 Songster

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    I'll take a sucker, natural I think looks better than straight
     
  9. showmesilkies

    showmesilkies Songster

    218
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    Dec 29, 2008
    Central Missouri
    My Coop
    what do you have to trade and location?
     
  10. CapricornFarm

    CapricornFarm Ready for fall. Premium Member

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    Southern Virginia
    With that list of stuff to trade, you need a catalog and just start selling!
     
    sfgwife and showmesilkies like this.

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