Super pale hen - Please Help!!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by The Chicken Whisperer, Jun 27, 2019.

  1. The Chicken Whisperer

    The Chicken Whisperer Songster

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    picture.png So, my friends bantam Old English Game hen is super pale, nearly colorless on her face. All visible skin, especially around her eyes, is super pale and has a blueish tint. Is this normal? She eats and drinks fine, and is still enthusiastic about treats, and she's still being a cuddly little sweetheart. However, she is not very lively at all and is rather wobbly on her feet. She also hangs around the coop and nest box a lot, but shes not broody as far as we can tell. Am I being paranoid, or is this a concern? Please help!!!
     
  2. micstrachan

    micstrachan Free Ranging

    She does look as if she could be anemic. How old is she, and was she more red in the face before? Does she have any signs of pin feathers, which would indicate molting? How does her poop look? How is the condition of her breast muscle? Can you look her over carefully for external parasites, especially around her vent and under wings? Can her owner take a poop sample into a vet for a fecal float? In the mean time, this sweetie might benefit from a natural iron boost like raw liver slivers or meat. Do either of you have nutridrench on hand that can be added to her water or direct dosed? Sorry about all the questions, but more info will help.
     
  3. The Chicken Whisperer

    The Chicken Whisperer Songster

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    She's two years old. She was more red in the face before. Her feathers are healthy and full, no sign of molting. I didnt see any parasites... we'll look again when its light out. We don't have any Nutridrench on hand - we may be able to get some tomorrow. Her poop seems normal but we can probably get a vet appointment very soon and give them a sample. We will certainly try the meat idea. Thank you so much for your help!!!
     
  4. micstrachan

    micstrachan Free Ranging

    You bet. She may also benefit from a heat source, like a heating pad set on low, as long as she is strong enough to get off of it if she wants to.

    Is she laying eggs? If so, when was the last one?
     
  5. The Chicken Whisperer

    The Chicken Whisperer Songster

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    She isn't laying regularly and hasn't laid for a very long time. Heating pad idea sounds great. She already sleeps inside since a past infection. She seems strong and mobile, she just doesn't really want to move much. Thank you sooo much again for helping!!
     
  6. micstrachan

    micstrachan Free Ranging

    Absolutely happy to help. The not laying could be a sign. Can you check for two things:
    • Breast muscle condition - is it wasting away with a prominent keel bone?
    • Abdomen (fluffy area below vent and between legs) consistency - does it feel swollen, bloated, squishy at all? If you can’t tell, try to compare her to another then her size in the morning.

    Either or both of these things could indicate a reproductive disorder. Does she have a penguin-like stance at all?
     
  7. micstrachan

    micstrachan Free Ranging

    Also, what was the past infection and how was it treated? It may have returned.
     
  8. micstrachan

    micstrachan Free Ranging

    If she sleeps inside, does that also mean she doesn’t dust bathe? Definitely take a closer look for parasites in the morning. Sorry to be throwing everything at you. I hope we can help you figure this out so you can help her. I was a sick one myself right now. Going to sleep now (it’s midnight), but I’ll check in tomorrow.
     
  9. The Chicken Whisperer

    The Chicken Whisperer Songster

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    Her keel bone is extremely prominent. Her abdomen seems fine though. Her stance seems normal too apart from being wobbly. The past infection was some infection near her vent. The vet gave her antibiotics and she was bathed every couple of weeks but whatever the problem was never fully went away. The vet didn't know for sure what it was.The chicken spends the day outside in her own little pen with plenty of access to the dirt. Would you suggest you bring her into the vet again?
     

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