Surveillance camera infrared lights. Will they keep my chickens awake at night?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by ATGATT, Aug 18, 2016.

  1. ATGATT

    ATGATT Just Hatched

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    May 14, 2016
    Springfield, Mo.
    I have almost completed my coop and I was considering the effect my surveillance camera's infrared lights might have on the hens. I have one which will point directly at one of the windows from above and I had considered putting one inside the coop as well. How will the lights affect the hens?
     
  2. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps

    No it will not keep them awake, even if they can 'see' it it's very, very low lumens nothing that is going to bother them...
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2016
  3. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    My Coop
    I have found that even very low light levels effect birds. Honestly, they need at least 8 hours of solid darkness. I read somewhere about an experiment done with a single small candle flame in the coop in the winter. It was enough to stop them from going into a molt and the birds laid eggs all winter. And while infra-red is not supposed to bother their sleeping cycle patterns, I would still prefer to have my birds with at least 8 hours of solid darkness.

    In your case of wanting to use these lights for deterring predators, I would point these lights along the outside low to the ground where you think they might be digging, climbing up to a window or on the roof, etc...predators are vulnerable themselves at ground level where they already are. I keep white solar lights all around my coop and run. They are at ground level and I point them right at the coop about a foot up along the sides. I have found this is enough to keep the coyotes, cougars, coons, skunks, etc... from prowling. Nothing likes to be seen at night, including the predators. However I don't allow these lights to shine into any windows to disturb the sleeping birds. Some of my solar lights have been burning for 7 years now and other than a battery change around the 5th year, I have never done any maintenance to these things.
     
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  4. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    The moon on a clear night reflects more light than the IR light put out by security cameras... Anyone that lives in an urban area most likely never sees a dark night... Plus the IR is an entirely different band of light and simply does not effect their sleep patterns...

    Beyond artificial environments like locked coops a bird is never going to get total darkness, and they do just fine with small amounts of light at night...

    IMO lights are useless as a predator deterrent in the long run, in most areas predators have become so urbanized and don't give a hoot about artificial lights... There are coyotes, raccoons, skunks and what not in my area that walk down the fully lit sidewalks in neighborhoods as peoples motion detector lights blink on and off as the animals pass, doesn't phase them at all... I live on a farm and I have area lights around all the outbuildings, trust me it doesn't phase the predators at all, but it does make it a lot easier for me to sling hot lead at them when they do come around...
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2016
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  5. ATGATT

    ATGATT Just Hatched

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    May 14, 2016
    Springfield, Mo.
    I'm not so much worried about predators as I am people. (I have cameras all around my house) I do, however, also like the idea of being able to check on my birds at night without going to the coop.
     
  6. MeepBeep

    MeepBeep Chillin' With My Peeps


    Understand, that reply was to another poster...

    As for IR, if you go to this page you will see the 'visual spectrum' a chicken (and human) can see http://www.onceinnovations.com/the-science/poultry-vision

    If we look at the chart of 'chicken vision' below, we can see that chickens can see much more IR and UV than humans, but even the chickens IR vision is pretty much over at 750nm, the standard IR wavelength for IR cameras is 840-850nm (or 950nm in some high end cases) both well outside the chickens visual range... That isn't to say their 'third eye' glands might not detect it to some degree, but again it's very low lumens in the end and will become the 'norm' so I highly doubt it's even a measurable concern in chicken sleep behavior... As I said I'll bet the lunar cycles or degree of clouds in the sky effects their sleep more, and that is nature....

    [​IMG]
     
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