Swarm capture

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by darkmatter, Sep 16, 2012.

  1. darkmatter

    darkmatter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'd been without a beehive for a while, when manna from heaven flew into my backyard.
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    Once they're settled in and building comb, I'll move the hive to a stand in a better location.
     
  2. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    A swarm of bees in May is worth a stack of hay, a swarm of bees in June is worth a silver spoon, a swarm of bees in July isn't worth a fly. Don't know about a swarm of bees in Sept. Depending upon where you live, they only have about a month or so to build up pollen and honey reserves for winter. Keep an eye on how they are doing and feed if necessary. That's a good sized swarm. Hopefully they will build up enough reserves to get through the winter.
     
  3. darkmatter

    darkmatter Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yeah, I never saw a Swarm this late either. They showed up a day or so after a gully-washer of a rain storm, perhaps they were forced to evacuate! I have been feeding sugar water, they are building comb like mad. I have my doubts that they'll make it through the winter, but I'll give them my best.
     
  4. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    We had a wet spring/early summer here in NJ and vegetation is thick. Right now goldenrd is heavily in bloom and the bees are working it heavily. It is a great source of pollen and nectar. When the bees are workng it, you can smell the hives from a half mile away. If you have a source like this, they just may make it. By the size of that swarm it may very well have been an entire colony that was forced to move because of a hive 'catastrophe'. I'll hope for an extended Indian Summer for your colony.
     
  5. darkmatter

    darkmatter Chillin' With My Peeps

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  6. Blarneyeggs

    Blarneyeggs Overrun With Chickens

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    OH my Goodness!!! With nothing but a collapsable laundry tote and no veil?! You da man!!!

    Congrats, I hope they make it for you!!
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. Rezia

    Rezia Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 3, 2012
    Apache Junction, AZ
    Amazing! Wonderful job!
    Rezia
     
  8. ailurophile23

    ailurophile23 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We've had quite a few really late swarms this year here in SW Virginia. As long as they are drawing comb and bringing in/taking in food, hopefully they will make it. I've used a wooden hivetop feeder for winter feedings of weak/small hives with good success. I like the laundry hamper to collect the swarm - terrific idea!
     
  9. blueeyeddemon

    blueeyeddemon Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oh wow!! I would have been stung by every single bee at least twice :/
     
  10. sourland

    sourland Broody Magician Premium Member

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    Nope. That's the marvel of swarms. The bees leave their original home with bellies filled with honey and plans for a 'new beginning'. They don't want to sting because their death would weaken a colony that need all it's workers to survive. (And if one did sting, it would only be once. Their stingers are barbed and rip from the body when utilized.)
     

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