Swelling on silkie rooster's comb - Help!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Silkie123456789, Mar 18, 2017.

  1. Silkie123456789

    Silkie123456789 New Egg

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    Mar 18, 2017
    hi, my silkie rooster's comb has swollen, and is now very large, his eyes are also a bit watery. I have no idea what it could be, and I am getting a bit worried about him. Does anyone know what is could be? (I will post a picture of him in the morning) Thanks
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC. Pictures would be very helpful. Silkies are a little more difficult to judge in pictures because of their grey skin, but it would help to see the comb. Do you live in a cold climate where frostbite may be a problem? Watery eyes could be an early sign of a respiratory infection, a problem with ammonia fumes in the coop, or other reasons. Do you hear any sneezing or gasping?
     
  3. Silkie123456789

    Silkie123456789 New Egg

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    Mar 18, 2017
    hi, thanks for the reply. It is not very cold where we live, but the chickens do get frost bite from time to time. I have noticed my silkies sneezing a bit though. I have a broody hen that does some broody poos in the chicken house, so would that be what's causing it? I will post a pic of him soon. Thanks :)
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Respiratory problems can be decreased if air circulation is good overhead, prevent wet bedding that leads to mold, and of prevention of ammonia odor in coop, and not use heat. I doubt that it is the broody poo unless it is a very small coop. They are pretty smelly though, LOL. some of the more common respiratory diseases such as infectious bronchitis and mycoplasma (MG) may cause sneezing and watery eyes. Here is some reading:
    Infectious Bronchitis

    Synonyms: IB, bronchitis, cold
    Species affected: Infectious bronchitis is a disease of chickens only. A similar disease occurs in bobwhite quail (quail bronchitis), but it is caused by a different virus.
    Clinical signs: The severity of infectious bronchitis infection is influenced by the age and immune status of the flock, by environmental conditions, and by the presence of other diseases. Feed and water consumption declines. Affected chickens will be chirping, with a watery discharge from the eyes and nostrils, and labored breathing with some gasping in young chickens. Breathing noises are more noticeable at night while the birds rest. Egg production drops dramatically. Production will recover in 5 or 6 weeks, but at a lower rate. The infectious bronchitis virus infects many tissues of the body, including the reproductive tract (see Table 1). Eggshells become rough and the egg white becomes watery. (See publication PS-24, Egg Quality, for other causes of poor egg quality.)
    Transmission: Infectious bronchitis is a very contagious poultry disease. It is spread by air, feed bags, infected dead birds, infected houses, and rodents. The virus can be egg-transmitted, however, affected embryos usually will not hatch.
    Treatment: There is no specific treatment for infectious bronchitis. Antibiotics for 3–5 days may aid in combating secondary bacterial infections. Raise the room temperature 5°F for brooding-age chickens until symptoms subside. Baby chicks can be encouraged to eat by using a warm, moist mash.
    Prevention: Establish and enforce a biosecurity program. Vaccinations are available.

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Synonyms: MG, chronic respiratory disease (CRD), infectious sinusitis, mycoplasmosis
    Species affected: chickens, turkeys, pigeons, ducks, peafowl, and passerine birds.
    Clinical signs: Clinical symptoms vary slightly between species. Infected adult chickens may show no outward signs if infection is uncomplicated. However, sticky, serous exudate from nostrils, foamy exudate in eyes, and swollen sinuses can occur, especially in broilers. The air sacs may become infected. Infected birds can develop respiratory rales and sneeze. Affected birds are often stunted and unthrifty (see Table 1).
    There are two forms of this disease in the turkey. With the "upper form" the birds have watery eyes and nostrils, the infraorbitals (just below the eye) become swollen, and the exudate becomes caseous and firm. The birds have respiratory rales and show unthriftiness.
    With the "lower form", infected turkeys develop airsacculitis. As with chickens, birds can show no outward signs if the infection is uncomplicated. Thus, the condition may go unnoticed until the birds are slaughtered and the typical legions are seen. Birds with airsacculitis are condemned.
    MG in chicken embryos can cause dwarfing, airsacculitis, and death.
    Transmission: MG can be spread to offspring through the egg. Most commercial breeding flocks, however, are MG-free. Introduction of infected replacement birds can introduce the disease to MG-negative flocks. MG can also be spread by using MG-contaminated equipment.
    Treatment: Outbreaks of MG can be controlled with the use of antibiotics. Erythromycin, tylosin, spectinomycin, and lincomycin all exhibit anti-mycoplasma activity and have given good results. Administration of most of these antibiotics can be by feed, water or injection. These are effective in reducing clinical disease. However, birds remain carriers for life.
    Prevention: Eradication is the best control of mycoplasma disease. The National Poultry Improvement Plan monitors all participating chicken and turkey breeder flocks.
     
  5. Silkie123456789

    Silkie123456789 New Egg

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    Mar 18, 2017
    Thanks for all the info. I hope i can get him better soon. :)

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    Last edited: Mar 19, 2017

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