Switching from to organic food from non-organic

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by littlels, Nov 21, 2011.

  1. littlels

    littlels Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was wondering how long it takes for the eggs/chickens to be considered organic after switching feed. Right now they mostly forage on their own, but we would like to switch what is available in the coop.
     
  2. twentynine

    twentynine Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Officially - forever!

    Once they have had inorganic feed they can't be considered organic ever.
     
  3. BlazeJester

    BlazeJester Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A recent post in another topic mentioned that FDA Organic certification requires NO supplements, treatments, antibiotics, or chemicals of any kind (fertilizers, weed killer, miticide, wormers) AS WELL AS no treated wood on the grounds for at least three years before chickens can be considered organic

    So, never, unless you are really, really committed and are looking to get FDA certified. It is something like a $11,000 fine to advertise organic eggs without FDA certification.

    People on the boards have discussed advertising "free range", "cage free" and lots of smiles and explaining when people ask about organic. People would often rather the birds be happy and healthy than buy organic eggs.
     
  4. Organics

    Organics New Egg

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    Which is somewhat ridiculous (regarding the above statement). I'm not doubting it's true, but frankly, tap water isn't chemical-free, anti-biotic-free or hormone-free...actually, the air that all creatures breathe isn't chemical free, either. Nothing is truly untainted if it exists near human civilization. For practical purposes (NOT labeling purposes), I'd ask the age of the birds to ascertain how much chemical build-up may have occured in the adipose tissue and organs from non-organic feed. If you are raising hens/eggs for your own consumption, I think a month of transition would give you reasonably organic eggs to enjoy. You cannot label and sell your eggs as organic for legal reasons, but perhaps that isn't your purpose. Edited to add: Maybe label your eggs as "backyard raised on organic feed, fresh air and green grass" or some such...it conveys the same idea to buyers without stepping on FDA regulations.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2011
  5. BlazeJester

    BlazeJester Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The guy with the organic post (I wish now that I could find it) also said the FDA was considering whether drinking water source should be a factor.

    Off their rockers, aren't they? No wonder organic eggs are so expensive!!!

    ETA: Success!!! https://www.backyardchickens.com/forum/viewtopic.php?id=600507

    Quote:
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2011
  6. littlels

    littlels Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you so much for your replies. I actually found them very interesting and thought provoking. We are looking just to eat healthier eggs and to sell a few but the other ideas for phrasing is great!
     
  7. Auscal

    Auscal Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't claim "organic eggs" - I don't want to have any potential problems. I just state "fed organic food, cage-free happy chickens".
     
  8. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    If you knew how many areas had contaminated drinking water, you wouldn't think that was so nutty.
     
  9. Organics

    Organics New Egg

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    Quote:The point is, ALL drinking water is contaminated...but sure, some water sources more so than others. For example, certain hormones and medications are not cleaned out of tap water. Anywhere. Even artesian wells and springs are not pure. Waste must go somewhere, it doesn't magically disappear. It ends up in ALL water, and in ALL air, in varying concentrations. Organic isn't pure, it's just a bit cleaner than another.
     

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