SWOLLEN ABDOMEN AND YELLOW LIQUID

Cierabug

Songster
May 13, 2018
98
89
106
Oroville , Northern California
My red star hens abdomen has been red and swollen for the past three days. Her vent and abdomen are red and can be seen straining. I tried to feel for an egg, but didnt feel anything. She has stopped trying to leave the coop an now just sits down all day with her eyes closed. She also has yellow liquid coming out of her vent. She was eating when this started but has since stopped. Does anybody know whats wrong with her ? Can she be helped or is it best to just put hee down ?
 

Folly's place

Enabler
10 Years
Sep 13, 2011
24,916
44,788
1,156
southern Michigan
Nearly nobody selects breeding stock with longevity in mind, it's all about either production or good looks. Chickens are bred at one year of age, which is most efficient/ economical for the breeder.
High egg producing hens in particular tend to have reproductive disasters at an early age, and many hens of many breeds are sick/ dying by age three. It's sad!
Major abdominal surgery is very difficult in birds, because they are so sensitive to being anesthetized for more than ten or fifteen minutes. An avian specialist may try it, but it's tough. Treatments and surgeries that are successful in mammals just aren't usually in birds. Aside from the cost!
My youngest bird with an abdominal disaster was a five (or six!) month old bantam, who had a uterine infection. My oldest hens have been ten years of age, and many haven't lived that long.
Do your best to provide a nice environment and good food, and enjoy them for who they are.
Mary
 

Cierabug

Songster
May 13, 2018
98
89
106
Oroville , Northern California
Nearly nobody selects breeding stock with longevity in mind, it's all about either production or good looks. Chickens are bred at one year of age, which is most efficient/ economical for the breeder.
High egg producing hens in particular tend to have reproductive disasters at an early age, and many hens of many breeds are sick/ dying by age three. It's sad!
Major abdominal surgery is very difficult in birds, because they are so sensitive to being anesthetized for more than ten or fifteen minutes. An avian specialist may try it, but it's tough. Treatments and surgeries that are successful in mammals just aren't usually in birds. Aside from the cost!
My youngest bird with an abdominal disaster was a five (or six!) month old bantam, who had a uterine infection. My oldest hens have been ten years of age, and many haven't lived that long.
Do your best to provide a nice environment and good food, and enjoy them for who they are.
Mary
Thanks for the tips and explanation , I think I'm gping to try to ne more careful with the breeds and stock i pick from now on. She lived for almost 5 years so at least thats longer than 3.
 

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