Swollen eye = virus hitting my flock

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by plantguy90, Aug 18, 2010.

  1. plantguy90

    plantguy90 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Well. lost two a few weeks ago, one 5 month BO just got weak and died, and a BR that was maybe a gew weeks younger also caught something. Eye was all swollen, and then she would turn the head upside down to see, and didnt eat and wasted away, now my oldest hen a BSL's eye is huge and swollen..

    The local breeder said there's a virus being carried by mosquitos that is doing all this. I was told they sting the head area which causes the swelling, but then some virus gets transmitted.

    Man, I dunno what to do... I put tetracyclene back in the water, but am not sure that's going to do the trick, now all I can do is wait... this sucks. I dont see how I can raise birds if you have to watch out for mosquitos, which I cant really control for.

    Anyone else going through this? I am in So Cal.
     
  2. perolane

    perolane Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 20, 2010
    Louisiana
    Sounds more like a type of influenza. More info below...see if any more of the symptoms match up. A broad spectrum antibiotic is needed. Good luck!





    Avian Influenza
    Synonyms: AI, flu, influenza, fowl plague

    Species affected: Avian influenza can occur in most, if not all, species of birds.

    Clinical signs: Avian influenza is categorized as mild or highly pathogenic. The mild form produces listlessness, loss of appetite, respiratory distress, diarrhea, transient drops in egg production, and low mortality. The highly pathogenic form produces facial swelling, blue comb and wattles, and dehydration with respiratory distress. Dark red/white spots develop in the legs and combs of chickens. There can be blood-tinged discharge from the nostrils. Mortality can range from low to near 100 percent. Sudden exertion adds to the total mortality. Egg production and hatchability decreases. There can be an increase in production of soft-shelled and shell-less eggs (see Table 1 ).

    Transmission: The avian influenza virus can remain viable for long periods of time at moderate temperatures and can live indefinitely in frozen material. As a result, the disease can be spread through improper disposal of infected carcasses and manure. Avian influenza can be spread by contaminated shoes, clothing, crates, and other equipment. Insects and rodents may mechanically carry the virus from infected to susceptible poultry.

    Treatment: There is no effective treatment for avian influenza. With the mild form of the disease, good husbandry, proper nutrition, and broad spectrum antibiotics may reduce losses from secondary infections. Recovered flocks continue to shed the virus. Vaccines may only be used with special permit.

    Prevention: A vaccination program used in conjunction with a strict quarantine has been used to control mild forms of the disease. With the more lethal forms, strict quarantine and rapid destruction of all infected flocks remains the only effective method of stopping an avian influenza outbreak. If you suspect you may have Avian Influenza in your flock, even the mild form, you must report it to the state veterinarian's office. A proper diagnosis of avian influenza is essential. Aggressive action is recommended even for milder infections as this virus has the ability to readily mutate to a more pathogenic form.
     
  3. plantguy90

    plantguy90 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    so tetracyclene is a broad-spectrum? Duramycin-10 is the brand its all everyone carries.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2010
  4. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    No antibiotic will do anything if the illness is viral. If bacterial, then a good broad spectrum antibiotic will help. Baytril is the best, but cannot legally be prescribed for flock-wide treatment. Tylan or gallimycin are also good choices. Oops, just saw you are in California; I don't think gallimycin is allowed there. Not sure why.

    Which type of tetricycline? Oxytetracycline or chlortetracycline? It's not the best or strongest antibiotic, but it will help with a mild bacterial infection. Any chance you could take a bird to the vet to get an accurate diagnosis?
     
  5. plantguy90

    plantguy90 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The last local vet I spoke with doent do "small flocks." All he suggested was for me to send the carcass to pathology at the UC extension.

    A rant- I've had 2 outbreaks of cocci, and now this. In one year I have lost more birds than I keep, The cost of my fresh eggs which production has not been consistant is way beyond if I even paid for the fancy "free range organic" eggs from the store.

    Oddly enough, I have 7 silkies, now 5 (2 were roos), that seem bullet proof compared to the troubles I have had raising layers.
     
  6. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Try another vet, and keep trying until you will find one who will see chickens. Try exotic or avian vets. Yes, if you have a dead bird, send it in for necropsy (I'm prety sure California is one of the states where it is free).

    Try getting any new layers from a different source.
     
  7. plantguy90

    plantguy90 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Oct 4, 2009
    Moorpark, CA
    Well, the BO the recently just died quickly without much warning or symptoms was from a different source, but the two that got swollen eyes are from the same place, although about 6 months apart. In April I got a BR chick from them, and last sept I got the BSL who was 4 months old. The BR died about two weeks ago and The BSL just got sick this week.
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2010

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