Swollen foot from a two-week old injury

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Corazon Ranch, Feb 18, 2015.

  1. Corazon Ranch

    Corazon Ranch Chillin' With My Peeps

    61
    2
    76
    Jul 28, 2012
    Looking for a treatment for my hen's foot. About two weeks ago some horrible creature gnawed her toes. Used wound-kote on the affected area and the wounds closed, but today I saw her foot is horribly swollen. Not sure if this is something I can treat with water-soluble antibiotics? Any and all suggestions welcome.
     
  2. MrsBrooke

    MrsBrooke Chillin' With My Peeps

    2,656
    271
    208
    Aug 11, 2014
    Magnolia, Texas
    A picture would definitely help.

    Could it be bumblefoot?

    MrsB
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

    30,730
    5,078
    561
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Rats can bite off toes of chickens while on the roost. I would soak her feet in warm epsom salts daily, and apply iodine or plain antibiotic ointment such as Neosporin. Gallimycin (erythromycin) can be used in the water or procaine penicillin can be given as a shot, for an antibiotic. A vet could prescribe stronger ones.
     
    2 people like this.
  4. Corazon Ranch

    Corazon Ranch Chillin' With My Peeps

    61
    2
    76
    Jul 28, 2012
    The "local" vet (40 miles away) gave me a 0.5 mL injection of antibiotic to administer. Hopefully I got the needle deep enough into the breast muscle but he said it would still work if it was only subcutaneous, though the medicine would be less potent. I freshened her wood shavings too.

    I like the idea of a warm water foot bath with epsom salts, though I don't have any on hand right now.

    The real impedance is that I have a 4-week old baby boy taking up most of my time. Additionally, these kinds of infections can be easily transmitted to humans so I don't want to endanger my newborn.
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

    30,730
    5,078
    561
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Injections into the breast muscle should only be given 1/4 inch deep, so as not to enter another organ. Usually good hand washing or rubber gloves, and wearing a chicken coop coat and shoes, should be enough to spread any bacteria. Most wound infection germs are commonly found on the skin. Epsom salts can be found in grocery stores, and in places like Walmart. They are used for foot soaking and as a strong laxative. Until you get some, warm soapy water or a tablespoonful of salt dissolved in a gallon of warm water would do.
     
    1 person likes this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by