Taking cuttings

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by Fierlin1182, Oct 16, 2011.

  1. Fierlin1182

    Fierlin1182 powered-flight

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    We've got our eye on taking a cutting off a friend's mulberry tree: we're massive mulberry fans but it's so hard to find them around these days!
    Problem is, none of us know how to do it properly. Usually we just cut a branch off a tree cleanly and slot it in a jar of water... none of them have ever survived this way. So we tried sticking them straight into soil: the only plant this has worked with is a very hardy species of decorative shrub.

    Anyhow, so I'm thinking we're cutting it wrong somehow... anyone got any advice on how to do it properly?
     
  2. OvertheHenHouse

    OvertheHenHouse Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 12, 2011
    San Diego
    Well, I've read about a rooting liquid you can buy at any local nursery that will get cuttings to root. I haven't used it but it's supposed to work well. Based on experience, I wouldn't expect a tree cutting stuck in soil to survive. And I wonder about grafting - tried it once unsuccessfully, but it might be something to consider.
    I'm lucky to have a mulberry here - and funny thing was, it was dormant when we moved in so I had no idea it was a mulberry!
    Good luck -
     
  3. justbugged

    justbugged Head of the Night Crew for WA State

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    You may need to look into grafting. Trees are usually propagated that way. Very few will just root in water or soil.
     
  4. Fierlin1182

    Fierlin1182 powered-flight

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    Oh okay, this grafting you speak of might be what I was trying to get at, I am so clueless when it comes to terminology! [​IMG] How does grafting work?

    Over: You're so lucky! We have all manners of fruit trees, but I'd trade 'em all for a good mulberry one! [​IMG] (Well, maybe not the fig. I have a soft spot for figs too [​IMG])
     
  5. OvertheHenHouse

    OvertheHenHouse Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 12, 2011
    San Diego
    Mmmm.....fresh figs....
    Sorry - got sidetracked. I did grafting once and it wasn't successful so I'm not the best person to give advice. I'd google how to graft a fruit tree branch. It involved scoring the bark on an existing fruit tree, peeling it away from the trunk, slicing the cutting on the diagonal, soaking everything and wrapping it up so the branch grafts on to the existing trunk.
    I sure hope you're more successful than I was - and BTW, this year the birds got to the mulberries before they were even ripe, stinkers [​IMG]
     
  6. justbugged

    justbugged Head of the Night Crew for WA State

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    ray's two cents :

    Oh okay, this grafting you speak of might be what I was trying to get at, I am so clueless when it comes to terminology! [​IMG] How does grafting work?

    Over: You're so lucky! We have all manners of fruit trees, but I'd trade 'em all for a good mulberry one! [​IMG] (Well, maybe not the fig. I have a soft spot for figs too [​IMG])

    Try using Google for grafting ideas. Typically you use root stock of tree that is easy to grow, and it needs to be hardy. I have heard of almond trees and plums being used. You would then split the trunk of the very young tree, and then you insert mullberry cutting. You really need to look at some pictures to get the way to slice the cutting and the trunk. A rooting hormone is very useful when grafting.​
     
  7. Fierlin1182

    Fierlin1182 powered-flight

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    Oh man, that sounds way too complicated! I think I'd better try my luck on the cutting [​IMG]
    Does it have to be the same type of tree? (Or is that a really stupid question? [​IMG])

    We get parrots down here: they eat the apples, pears, grapes... hundreds of 'em, our garden must be like a paradise for them! [​IMG] We usually manage to save the grapes though, as they're hidden under the leaves and the birds have got nothing to grip on while they're eating.
     
  8. Fierlin1182

    Fierlin1182 powered-flight

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    Quote:Try using Google for grafting ideas. Typically you use root stock of tree that is easy to grow, and it needs to be hardy. I have heard of almond trees and plums being used. You would then split the trunk of the very young tree, and then you insert mullberry cutting. You really need to look at some pictures to get the way to slice the cutting and the trunk. A rooting hormone is very useful when grafting.

    Okay, so it doesn't have to be the same type of tree. That helps! [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This helps a bit, I kinda understand now.
     
  9. justbugged

    justbugged Head of the Night Crew for WA State

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    Raintree nursery has offered classes in grafting. But even if you live in Washington State, Raintree is a very long way from anywhere. They may have advice online. They also may carry Mullberry trees. Raintree Nursery has quality product, and a vast line of trees, and fruit bearing shrubs. I have never regretted anything that I have bought from them. My only complaint was the size of two trees I bought via mail order, but 20 years later both trees are strong and tall, and I had the joy of watching them grow.
     
  10. justbugged

    justbugged Head of the Night Crew for WA State

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    I just figured out that you are Down-Under so a nursery in the states won't be a easy source for you. I hope you find what you are looking for. Best wishes on learning to graft trees also.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2011

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