Talked to Dr at UC DAVIS Meraks

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by cherylcohen, Nov 19, 2009.

  1. cherylcohen

    cherylcohen The Omelet Ranch

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    We've lost our 4th chicken to meraks and i think I have 3 more that might have it, they are looking thin....It was very interesting talking to her. We got meraks because the first farm we got our first 4 girls from later found out their flocks had Meraks(and didn't even tell us!) We got 9 more girls since then and now I think we may lose 3 more. Oh I'm so sad, the sweetest ones are the ones I think are sick, maybe that's why they are so sweet.

    My question. We obviously now have meraks on our property. Does anyone no if we were to locate the coop across the property - or I guess we'd have to build a new coop correct?...so if we put it across the property (we've only got .8 acres, so it's not that big of a lot) is there a chance the meraks won't follow us. Oh I guess these are stupid questions I'm just loking for possible solutions.

    Next question, let's say I want to get more chickens. The vaccine works MOST of the time, based on considerations of how it's administered and other criteria...are there more reliable places to get chickens that have a good "resistance" quotient?
     
  2. theFox

    theFox Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2009
    Standish, Maine
  3. cherylcohen

    cherylcohen The Omelet Ranch

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    I didn't think disinfecting helped with meraks. So you mean I can never integrate the new chickens?

    it's a airborne disease correct, so I'm wondering if I move the coop to another location if that could help?
     
  4. NJbirdlover

    NJbirdlover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Salem County, NJ
    I think you have to wait a certain amount of time before re-introducing chickens to the affected area...not sure how long but I think it is several months...or more
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2009
  5. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Mareks is considered to be everywhere. Most believe in breeding for resistance rather than vaccinating. I do not think moving the birds to the other side of your property will be a significant deterrant. Vaccination does not eliminate the disease--it merely gives the bird additional antibodies to fight it and help prevent the system from being overwhelmed. I believe a vaccinated bird sheds the virus as much as one who has or has had the disease, although it has been awhile since I did research on this.
     
  6. theFox

    theFox Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2009
    Standish, Maine
    The vaccine gives the chicks a leg up. Disinfecting your brooder will in fact kill the virus. Isolation slows down the transmission.

    Yes Marek's is probably everywhere, however you want to expose your chickens gradually, not all at once with a known high level infection source (your current flock).

    You'll be able to integrate your new chickens after they have had a chance to slowly acquire some resistance. Otherwise you'll be in exactly the same spot all over again.

    Now they are your chicks and you can do what you wish with them.
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2009
  7. cherylcohen

    cherylcohen The Omelet Ranch

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    what is the best method for disinfecting...should I do it now, can it help the current girls??
     
  8. theFox

    theFox Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2009
    Standish, Maine
    Yes you can keep your girls, you should disinfect your brooder and its area (which should be located away from the area your current flock uses, a simple bleach solution should do the trick.

    I don't have a clue as to where you brood your chicks but no mater where it turns out to be it should never be where your current flock is, think about the normal safeguard of isolating new comers in order to protect an existing flock. This is exactly the same thing only instead of suspecting the new comers of having a bad disease you already know the existing flock has one. So you protect the new ones. It seems most folks use 30 days. Please read the links I provided.

    I've never had to deal with a disease outbreak.

    I try to err on the side of caution.
     
  9. theFox

    theFox Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 21, 2009
    Standish, Maine
    I should add that your current flock has been completely exposed, some of your flock will survive, you have already lost some, it will not help your current flock to disinfect their area.

    The ones that survive will continue to shed the virus, which is why you need to give the new comers a chance to acquire immunity.
     
  10. AHappychick

    AHappychick Wanna-be Farmer

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    o I have been there... You will never get rid of the Mareks fully so vaccinating chicks is the best way to go although it is not perfect. In addition if you get birds from a breeder who has culled off all birds that have come down with Mareks and only bred those that did not those chicks will be more resistent to the disease. So in the same vein the chicks you have that survive and do not come down with it will breed stronger more resistent chicks. Any birds that you help get over the mareks will be carriers even if they get better, those that never show the disease will be resistent and not carriers.

    Hope this helps. I vaccinate and also cull any that come down with it now. I havent had an issue with it in 8 months or so but expect it to possibl rear its ugly head with my new up and comers but so far so good. [​IMG] I dont know of any hatchery or anyplace that has more resistent chicks but if you ask around for breeders who only keep some cocci meds and a hatchett in their med kit then you will probably get some very strong chicks from them.
     

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