tell me everything you know about coccicodios

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by the3ofus+oursixchicks, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. the3ofus+oursixchicks

    the3ofus+oursixchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 22, 2011
    alabama
    to start with i am pretty sure i spelled that wrong but, i am sure yall know what i am talking about. ok i have never delt with this before so i need alot of advice. to start with i am starting the chicks on corrid tonight. i have 4 little ones. only one so far is sick it has bloody poop. around 5 to 6 weeks not for sure. i got them from an individual. ok here i go............i know its contageous to the other chicks, what about my 2 big girls, will they catch it? do i need to clean everything? if so with what? what about the little ones being in my house? still somewhat chilly here in alabama right now but supposed to warm back up. can they be in the yard and poop? what all should i do? LAY IT ON ME!
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Jacksonville, Florida
    It wouldnt hurt to treat all your birds. Protozoa laden feces can and will infect other birds. Ensure your feeders and waterers are sanitized. Here's link:
    http://ultimatefowl.atwiki.com/page/Coccidiosis
     
  3. the3ofus+oursixchicks

    the3ofus+oursixchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 22, 2011
    alabama
    seem they have very runny poop to very watery. that was one of the symptoms right
     
  4. the3ofus+oursixchicks

    the3ofus+oursixchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 22, 2011
    alabama
    also they seem very very very thirsty.
     
  5. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Nov 27, 2008
    Jacksonville, Florida
  6. Moondance

    Moondance Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 9, 2012
    I'm having the same problem myself at the moment. Got some chicks a week ago. Not sure how old, they were just starting to get their wing feathers and now have their full wing feathers.

    I noticed on Tuesday morning that one of them wasn't well. She'd been eating, drinking, etc, but when I picked her up, she felt thin and bony with breast bone protruding. I had to go away for several days and had my friend looking after them. During that duration the one chick that was bony died, one other started pooping blood and couldn't walk or move, so she humanely put it to sleep, and a third died.
    Now I have 2 others that are underweight and breast bone protruding, one thats pooping blood, but I cannot for the life of me work out which one, I've checked all of their vents, but can't work out the one pooping the blood.
    The two that are underweight are droopy winged, listless, they're still drinking water and nibbling at food, but not really moving around. And they will only drink water if its placed in ONE certain place in the cage for some reason. You move the water from where it was and they won't touch it. Which is weird.

    They're in a cage on Superior brand wood shavings for bedding, with chick start for food, and they've got rain water that comes into their drinker from an outside source. All of my other animals also drink this same rain water, I have two older chickens, frizzles both, who are perfectly fine and healthy. I also have an older batch of chicks (Welshsummers) who WERE with these little ones, but housed seperately until either Monday or Tuesday night. Because its a large cage, they are in with my pet dove, Lilly.

    I'm extremely upset. As I got the batch of the dozen Pekin bantams, half dozen Welshsummers (who were fully feathered on their wings and at least a couple weeks old), 3 random chicks of unknown breeding, as well as 2 Indian Runner Ducklings.
    All the chicks and ducklings were together.
    But on Monday I decided to seperate them as the ducklings were particularly messy, which I didn't like and the Welshsummers needed more space, as they're much bigger.
    A day later, the issues first became obvious with the other chicks. The first 3 to go were the random bred youngsters, but now its effecting the Pekins.



    They are in an area where there are no other birds, BUT, there are domestic rats. Would that make a difference?
    I honestly don't know how they could have coccidiosis, as they are not around any other birds, chickens, etc, aside from my dove.
    If it WERE coccidiosis, how quickly would it effect such a young chick? Would it be noticable days in advance, or would it come on suddenly, like overnight?

    Anyway, yeah, those are my questions to add to this thread.... :(
     
  7. Cetawin

    Cetawin Chicken Beader

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    Cocci is very common and it lives in your soil and can also be contracted from a dirt brooder. Easily treated. Corid can be purchased at your farm supply store, feed store etc. It is a powder most often and is mixed in the water, it also comes in a liquid. It has nothing to do with bad breeding or etc.

    It is rare for adults and older birds to get cocci but it can happen when they are relocated to a different environment. Bringing in new chicks that were started somewhere else and suddenly they have it, it is caused because they are acclimated to one particular strain and when you bring them home, there may be a different strain in your soil...there are 7 or so strains. It is always wise to put new chicks on Corid, it is a safe antibiotic and will not harm them even when used as a preventative when bringing new chicks home from somewhere else.

    Medicated feed as a medication in it for cocci prevention but it does not always cover it.

    No need to panic, put them on Corid for 5 - 7 days then feed them a good probiotic or plain yogurt to replace the good bacteria in their gut. The dosage is on the package the 20% corid is dosed at 1/2 tsp per quart of water as a treating dosage....as a maintenance/preventative I use 1/4 tsp per quart.



    To the poster with the ducks...DO NOT medicate the ducklings.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2012
  8. the3ofus+oursixchicks

    the3ofus+oursixchicks Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 22, 2011
    alabama
    i have the liquid, is that different doses with the powder? i put 1 tsp to one gallon. is that correct for liquid? also they are in a big storage tub in my house is that ok? and do i need to santitize it everytime they poop? oh yeah and is it ok for them to still go out in the yard? thanks so much i have never had this before and i am a little freaked out by it. here is a pic i took this morning [​IMG]
     
  9. Moondance

    Moondance Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 9, 2012
    I'm going to wind up having to fork out a wad of money for this, as pretty much the ONLY treatment option I can find is something called "Coccivet", put out by Vetafarms.
    Pretty much everything else is "prescription only"... and NONE of our local vets even do birds or chickens. They're "small animal" vets, but who specialise in dogs and cats, mostly anything else gets thrown on the heap of "we don't have a bloody clue".

    Not really happy, feeling very discouraged.
    The whole point of getting chicks was to raise them up and sell them on when they're older. A friend of my dads does it and he actually manages to make a wad of money.... but this is going to run me down, as I set aside a certain amount of cash to buy the chicks and feed them, didn't really take into account vet bills and medications, as I've never in my life had anything come up like this before, despite having had chooks for years.

    I don't understand how they've been fine all week and then so suddenly are coming up sick.
    After I moved the older chicks and ducklings elsewhere, I cleaned out their cage, changed the bedding and a day later I have babies dying.

    Its not possible is it that they could be EATING the wood shavings??
     
  10. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Cocci is EXTREMELY common in chicks kept in a brooder. Happens all the time. Easily treated if you catch the symptoms early. You can buy Corid through Revival Animal Health or even Amazon.com (who gets it through various places). A 16 oz bottle of liquid is about $20 or so.

    Chicks raised by a broody hen who get on soil early really never get coccidiosis. They peck at mama's poop and pick up stuff in small amounts in the soil so they do better than any chicks raised with no contact with soil. In the future, put a small pan of dirt in the brooder with them in their first week of life, let them dustbathe in real dirt. That will help them keep from being overwhelmed by the oocycts in your soil when they get outside later.

    Oocycsts can be in their gut when they hatch, too, not just when they hit the soil. Its when their system is taken over by them that you see the signs of cocci. You just need to keep Corid on hand for when you have chicks, just in case.
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2012

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